Eighty-Two Individuals Indicted for Drug Trafficking in the Luis Lloréns Torres Public Housing Project

October 13, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on October 13, 2011 released the following:

“SAN JUAN, PR—On October 7, 2011, a federal grand jury indicted 82 individuals as a result of an investigation led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the Puerto Rico Police Department (PRPD), announced today United States Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodríguez-Vélez. The defendants are charged in a two-count indictment with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine, “crack” (cocaine base,) heroin, marijuana, and Oxycodone (also known as Percocet). The object of the conspiracy was to distribute controlled substances at the Luis Lloréns Torres Public Housing Project, located in San Juan, Puerto Rico for significant financial gain.

According to the indictment, from on or about March 2007, the object of the conspiracy of this drug trafficking organization was to possess with the intent to distribute and distribute cocaine, crack, heroin, marijuana, and Percocet at a drug distribution point located at the sector known as “Calle 4” within the Luis Lloréns Torres Public Housing Project. The main leaders of the organization were: Malvin Nater-Ayala, aka “Malvin”; Emanuel Rodríguez-Isaac, aka “Manuelito”; and Christian Rosario-Bonilla, aka “Christian Nora” and “Mellao.”

The defendants and their co-conspirators would purchase wholesale quantities of heroin, cocaine, and marijuana in order to distribute the same in street quantity amounts at their drug distribution points. The 82 co-conspirators had many roles, in order to further the goals of the conspiracy, including: three leaders, 14 enforcers, six suppliers, 21 drug owners, 12 runners, 53 sellers, and four facilitators.

It was further part of the manner and means of the conspiracy that the co-conspirators would use apartments and other locations to cook, store, package, and sell the drugs, and to conceal drugs, drug paraphernalia, drug ledgers, drug proceeds, scanners, firearms, and ammunition. The members of the drug trafficking organization would possess, carry, use, brandish, and discharge firearms in order to maintain control of their drug points and in order to protect themselves, their drugs and proceeds from rival individuals and organizations, and to expand their drug trafficking business within the community.

“Today’s operation was part of our Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) and contributes to our ongoing battle against the drug trafficking organizations that operate all around Puerto Rico,” said Rosa Emilia Rodríguez-Vélez, U.S. Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico. “We will not rest until every town is safe again, and all our citizens can live in peace.”

“The FBI and other state and local law enforcement agencies are dedicated to increasing the safety and security of the people of Puerto Rico by continuing to combat the violence permeating our community,” said Joseph S. Campbell, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI-San Juan Field Office.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Carmen Márquez and Ilianys Rivera.

If convicted, the defendants face a minimum of 10 years’ imprisonment and a maximum of life imprisonment, with fines of up to $10 million. Criminal indictments are only charges and not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Six Additional Defendants Charged in “Operation Prairie Eagle”

September 30, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on September 29, 2011 released the following:

“PEORIA, IL—A federal grand jury has returned indictments against six additional defendants as a result of “Operation Prairie Eagle,” a cooperative investigation targeting distribution of crack cocaine and marijuana in the Bloomington-Normal area. Fifteen defendants were previously indicted in May 2011.

The charges are the result of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation – Springfield Division and the Normal Police Department, with assistance provided by the Bloomington Police Department, the McLean County Sheriff’s Office, the McLean County State’s Attorney’s Office, and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of Illinois.

Four defendants, Richard George Martin, 32, of Bloomington, Ill.; Shane C. Crawford, 30, of Streator, Ill.; Chad Joseph Graff, 35, also of Streator; and Alex William Guhlstorf, 39, of Normal, are charged with conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute cocaine and marijuana. The one-count indictment alleges the conspiracy began in 2001 and continued to the present and involved more than five kilograms of cocaine and more than 100 kilograms of marijuana. The indictment also seeks criminal forfeiture of Martin’s bank accounts and cash totaling approximately $107,059.

If convicted, the statutory mandatory minimum penalty for conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute cocaine and marijuana is 10 years to life in prison. If a defendant has one or more prior felony drug convictions, the mandatory minimum penalty is 20 years to life in prison. With two or more prior felony drug convictions, the statutory penalty is life in prison.

In a separate indictment, Kelsie Linea Thirtyacre, 26, currently of Las Vegas, previously of Springfield, Ill., and Julie Lynn Foster, 32, of Cicero, Ill., are charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute marijuana. The indictment alleges the conspiracy began in 2001 and continued to Apr. 5, 2011, and involved more than 100 kilograms of marijuana. The women also each face three additional charges of using a telephone in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

If convicted, conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute marijuana carries a mandatory minimum penalty of five years to life in prison; if a defendant has one or more prior felony drug convictions, the mandatory minimum penalty is 10 years to life in prison. For using a telephone in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, the penalty is up to four years in prison.

The two indictments were returned yesterday; however, the charges had remained sealed pending the defendants’ arrests and court appearances today. Crawford, Graff, Guhlstorf, and Foster were arrested this morning and appeared in federal court in Peoria this afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge John A. Gorman. All were detained in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service pending hearings scheduled next week. Foster’s next hearing date is Oct. 6; hearings for Crawford, Graff and Guhlstorf are scheduled on Oct. 7. Martin, who is currently in the custody of the Illinois Department of Corrections, will appear at a later date. Thirtyacre was arrested this morning in Las Vegas, and will make an initial appearance in federal court in Las Vegas.

Members of the public are reminded that an indictment is merely an accusation; the defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officer Indicted on Drug Trafficking Charges

September 27, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on September 26, 2011 released the following:

“TUCSON, AZ— A federal grand jury in Tucson has returned a four-count superseding indictment against U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officer (CBPO) Luis Carlos Vasquez, 32; Victor Stuppi, 40; Jesus Antonio Chavez-Bustamante, 25; and Karla Beatriz Prieto, 23, all of Douglas, Ariz; and Saul Lizarraga-Roldan, 37; and Marcos Abraham Sandoval-Lizarraga, 22, both of Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana, possession with intent to distribute marijuana, conspiracy to import marijuana and importation of marijuana.

The indictment alleges that CBPO Vasquez conspired with the others named in the indictment to import marijuana through the Douglas Port of Entry (POE) while Vasquez was working an inspection lane. It is also alleged that on June 17, 2011, while Vasquez was working an inspection lane at the Douglas POE, he knowingly allowed 547 kilograms of marijuana to pass through his inspection lane in a Chevrolet Avalanche.

“Law enforcement officials must be held to a higher standard of conduct,” stated Acting U.S. Attorney Ann Birmingham Scheel. “In the rare and regrettable circumstance where a sworn officer crosses the line into criminal conduct and violates their oath and the public’s trust, they will be brought to justice.”

Vasquez was arrested on Friday, September, 23, 2011, and had his initial appearance today in federal court in Tucson. Vasquez was released pending trial on a $100,000 personal appearance bond. Stuppi has been released on a $50,000 personal appearance bond, Prieto has been released pending trial, Chavez-Bustamante and Lizarraga-Roldan have been detained pending trial and Sandoval-Lizarraga remains at large.

“This indictment signifies a collaborative effort by the FBI’s Border Corruption Task Force,” stated FBI Special Agent in Charge James L. Turgal Jr., Phoenix Division. “When a law enforcement officer participates in drug trafficking it taints the badge and memory of all those in law enforcement who risk their lives every day to uphold our laws and serve the public with trust and honor. The FBI, alongside our law enforcement partners, will continue to aggressively pursue those responsible for corruption along the border and those who violate the public’s trust.”

A conviction for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana carries a maximum penalty of 40 years’ imprisonment with a mandatory minimum term of five years, a $5,000,000 fine or both. Possession with intent to distribute marijuana carries a maximum penalty of 40 years’ imprisonment with a mandatory minimum term of five years, a $5,000,000 fine or both. Conspiracy to import marijuana carries a maximum penalty of 40 years’ imprisonment with a mandatory minimum term of five years, a $5,000,000 fine or both. Importation of marijuana carries a maximum penalty of 40 years’ imprisonment with a mandatory minimum term of five years, a $5,000,000 fine or both. In determining an actual sentence, Judge David C. Bury will consult the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines, which provide appropriate sentencing ranges. The judge, however, is not bound by those guidelines in determining a sentence.

An indictment is simply a method by which a person is charged with criminal activity and raises no inference of guilt. An individual is presumed innocent until competent evidence is presented to a jury that established guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

The investigation preceding the indictment was conducted by FBI-Sierra Vista, ICE Office of Professional Responsibility, the FBI’s Southern Arizona Corruption Task Force, and the Douglas Police Department. The prosecution is being handled by Joshua C. Mellor, Assistant U.S. Attorney, District of Arizona, Tucson.

CASE NUMBER: CR-11-2486-TUC-DCB”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Forty-Seven Individuals Indicted for Alleged Drug Trafficking in the Municipality of Corozal, Puerto Rico

September 22, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on September 22, 2011 released the following:

“SAN JUAN, PR— On September 21, 2011, a federal grand jury indicted 47 individuals as a result of an investigation led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Puerto Rico Police Department (PRPD)-Bayamón Strike Force, announced today United States Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodríguez-Vélez. The defendants are charged in a six-count indictment with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute heroin, “crack” (cocaine base,) cocaine, marijuana, Oxycodone (commonly known as “Percocet”), and Alprazolam (commonly known as “Xanax”). Count six charges 36 defendants with using and carrying firearms during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime.

According to the indictment, Luis Agosto-López, aka “Tutin,” became the main leader of the drug trafficking organization upon the death of Gamalier Rosado-Serrano, aka “Gamma,” on or about May 9, 2004. The object of the conspiracy was to distribute controlled substances at the Enrique Landron Public Housing Project, located in the Municipality of Corozal, Puerto Rico, for significant financial gain.

It was further part of the manner and means of the conspiracy that some of the defendants and their co-conspirators would provide payments to an undisclosed source in exchange for sensitive law enforcement information, as to dates and times of prospective interventions by the Police of Puerto Rico at the Enrique Landron Public Housing Project and/or police protection and escort to members of the conspiracy during the transportation of narcotics from different housing projects located within the Municipalities of San Juan and Bayamón to the Enrique Landron Public Housing Project.

The defendants and their co-conspirators would purchase wholesale quantities of heroin, cocaine, marijuana, Xanax, and Percocet in order to distribute the same in street quantity amounts at their drug distribution points. The 47 co-conspirators had many roles in order to further the goals of the conspiracy, including: seven leaders/drug point owners, one supplier, three enforcers, five runners, 24 sellers, one drug processor, three look-outs, and three facilitators.

The “drug owners” would often receive proceeds from the sale of these controlled substances. The controlled substances were sold in distinctive baggies, vials, or packaging, using stickers or brands in order to identify and maintain control of the drugs disseminated at the drug distribution points. They would use their homes to process kilogram quantities of narcotics for street level sales. The members of the drug trafficking organization would use force, violence and intimidation in order to gain and maintain control of their drug points and in order to intimidate rival drug trafficking organizations and/or expand their drug trafficking activities.

“Violent drug organizations hold our communities hostage, and promulgate fear, intimidation, and violence, threatening the well being of law abiding citizens,” said Rosa Emilia Rodríguez-Vélez, U.S. Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico. “This investigation has taken dangerous criminals off the streets of Puerto Rico and send a clear message to other violent gangs that we will break their grip on our communities and bring them to justice.”

“This gang was a very violent gang which maintained control of its drug trafficking activities by way of force, violence, and intimidation, but after today’s law enforcement action, this gang will no longer cause harm to the people of Puerto Rico and the residents of the town of Corozal,” said Carlos Cases-Gallardo, Acting Special Agent in Charge of the FBI-San Juan Field Office.

This case is being prosecuted by Special Assistant United States Attorneys Alberto López-Rocafort and Cesar Rivera-Giraud.

If convicted, the defendants face a minimum of 10 years’ imprisonment and a maximum of life imprisonment, with fines of up to $8 million. Criminal indictments are only charges and not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Thirty-Nine Individuals Indicted for the Alleged Drug Trafficking in the Municipality of Ceiba, Puerto Rico

September 16, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on September 15, 2011 released the following:

“SAN JUAN, PR—On September 8, 2011, a federal grand jury indicted 39 individuals as a result of an investigation led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Puerto Rico Police Department (PRPD) – Fajardo Strike Force, announced today United States Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodríguez-Vélez. The defendants are charged in a six-count indictment with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute heroin, “crack” (cocaine base,) cocaine, marijuana, Oxycodone (commonly known as “Percocet”), and Alprazolam (commonly known as “Xanax”). Count six charges 21 defendants with using and carrying firearms during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime.

The object of the conspiracy led by two women and two men was to distribute and supply controlled substances at the Jardines de Ceiba Public Housing Project and other areas within the municipality of Ceiba for significant financial gain. The leader was Karen Santiago-Vélez, aka “La Gorda” and “La Bichota”; her two brothers, Juan C. Santiago-Vélez, aka “Cabestro” and “El Gordo,” and Erick Santiago-Vélez, aka “Catote” and “Gargola”; and their mother and owner of the Percocet and Xanax distribution point, Carmen A. Vélez-García, aka “La Vieja” and “La Mother.”

The defendants and their co-conspirators would purchase wholesale quantities of heroin, cocaine, marihuana, Xanax and Percocet in order to distribute the same in street quantity amounts at their drug distribution points. The leaders would routinely use and employ juveniles under the ages of 18 to distribute narcotics.

The 39 co-conspirators had many roles, in order to further the goals of the conspiracy, including: four leaders, four managers/drug owners, four enforcers, one supplier, 10 runners, and 16 sellers.

The “drug owners” would often receive proceeds from the sale of specific controlled substances. These controlled substances were sold in distinctive baggies, vials or packaging, using stickers or brands in order to identify, and maintain control of the drugs disseminated at the drug distribution points. It was further part of the manner and means of the conspiracy that the defendants and their co-conspirators when preparing an accounting of narcotics sold, otherwise known as “the tally sheet,” would use different letters to refer to the different types of narcotics sold and the people who sold them, as a way to hide from other persons, the real meaning and purpose of the document. They would use their homes to process kilogram quantities of narcotics for street level sales. The members of the drug trafficking organization would use force, violence and intimidation in order to gain and maintain control of their drug points and in order to intimidate rival drug trafficking organizations and/or expand their drug trafficking activities.

“We will continue to vigorously pursue those who choose to become involved in drug trafficking organizations and wreak havoc on our communities,” said Rosa Emilia Rodríguez-Vélez, U.S. Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico. “The arrests in this case clearly demonstrate the dedication and commitment of our prosecutors and law enforcement partners to rid our communities of violent offenders. Ceiba will certainly be a safer place without the presence of these individuals.”

“Today’s law enforcement operation dismantles the Jardines de Ceiba drug trafficking organization, and it is worth mentioning that the leadership of this criminal enterprise was composed of family members and relatives,” said Carlos Cases, Acting Special Agent in Charge of the FBI-San Juan Field Office. “These arrests should lead to a safer community at the Jardines de Ceiba Public Housing Project and its surrounding neighborhoods.”

This case is being prosecuted by Special Assistant United States Attorney Cesar Rivera-Giraud.

If convicted, the defendants face a minimum of 10 years’ imprisonment and a maximum of life imprisonment, with fines of up to $8 million. Criminal indictments are only charges and not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Texas Syndicate Gang Members and Associates Sentenced to Prison

August 31, 2011

U.S. Attorneys Office Southern District of Texas on August 30, 2011 released the following:

“McALLEN, Texas – Six Texas Syndicate members and associates have been sentenced to prison for racketeering, violent crimes in aid of racketeering, kidnapping and possession with intent distribute cocaine, United States Attorney Jose Angel Moreno announced today.

At a hearing on Monday, Aug. 29, 2011, Chief U.S. District Judge Ricardo Hinojosa sentenced the chairman of the Texas Syndicate in the Rio Grande Valley, Jose Ismael Salas, 40 of Edinburg, Texas, to 20 years in federal prison without parole for drug trafficking offenses in violation of the racketeering statute. Salas pleaded guilty on April 2, 2009, admitting to committing two acts of racketeering, namely two separate acts of possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance – six kilograms of cocaine on Aug. 12, 2004, and 39 kilograms of marijuana on March 28, 2003, intending to further the goals of the gang.

Five other members or associates of the gang were also sentenced yesterday by Judge Hinojosa including Fidel Valle, 45 of Donna, Texas – the source of drug supply to the gang who employed gang members to assist in his drug distribution business. He received 126 months imprisonment for possession with intent to distribute six kilograms of cocaine. On July 28, 2009,Valle pleaded guilty to the federal felony drug charge acknowledging that on Aug. 12, 2004, upon being contacted by Salas, Valle agreed to sell approximately six kilograms (approximately 13 pounds) of cocaine to Salas’s associates. That drug load was found and seized by law enforcement officers during a traffic stop of a Ford pickup seen leaving Valle’s residence in Donna on Aug. 12, 2004.

Romeo Rosales, 41 of Raymondville, Texas – an admitted Texas Syndicate gang member who was convicted of kidnapping Amancio Pinales-Garcia – was sentenced to 151 months imprisonment. Reyes, son-in-law of the kidnapping victim, sought a monetary reward to turn over Pinales-Garcia to unknown subjects in Mexico. Pinales-Garcia was shot several times in the low torso during the struggle and subsequently died in Mexico. Rosales pleaded guilty to kidnapping Pinales-Garcia on March 3, 2009.

Noel De Los Santos, 33, of Donna, Texas was sentenced to 240 months imprisonment for violent crimes in aid of racketeering, that is, for the murder of Crisantos Moran on March 20, 2003. According to trial testimony, Moran had been ordered by the Texas Syndicate to kill a rival gang member who lived near Penitas, Texas. De Los Santos and Jose Armando Garcia, both Texas Syndicate gang members, agreed to accompany Moran to commit the murder. However, Moran failed to carry out the order as given. Instead, De Los Santos and Garcia shot and killed Moran for failing to carry out the order. On Aug. 10, 2010, Garcia was convicted of racketeering and violent crimes in aid of racketeering and was sentenced to life in prison on Jan. 5, 2011.

Cristobal Hernandez, 31, and Arturo Rodriguez, 28, both of Brownsville, Texas, were sentenced to 120 and 240 months imprisonment, respectively, for violent crimes in aid of racketeering arising from the murder of Marcelino Rodriguez in June 2007. After members of the Texas Syndicate obtained a copy of a sealed court document from an employee of a McAllen area law firm which represented Marcelino Rodriguez in a federal case, the murder of Marcelino Rodriguez was approved by the leadership of the Texas Syndicate. Hernandez and Arturo Rodriguez were recruited by Raul Galindo to commit the murder. Galindo shot Marcelino Rodriguez in the back of the head while Arturo Rodriguez set the vehicle on fire with gasoline. On Aug. 10, 2010, Galindo was convicted of violent crimes in aid of racketeering and tampering with a witness, victim or an informant. On Jan. 5, 2011, Galindo was sentenced to life imprisonment.

All six of the defendants sentenced yesterday are in federal custody and will remain in custody pending transfer to Bureau of Prisons facilities to be designated in the near future.

All 13 charged in this case have been convicted and sentenced to prison. Juan Pablo Hinojosa, who was convicted by a federal jury of racketeering and violent crimes in aid of racketeering, was sentenced to life imprisonment on Jan. 5, 2011. On Jan. 28, 2010, Benjamin Piedra pleaded guilty to violent crimes in aid of racketeering and was sentenced to 120 months confinement and three years of supervised release on Feb. 22, 2011. Adan Roberto Ruiz pleaded guilty to criminal information charging him with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute less than 50 kilograms of marijuana, while Jorge Puga pleaded to a criminal information charging him with possession with intent to distribute 39 kilograms of marijuana. Ruiz and Puga received 52 and 37 months, respectively. Joel Carcano Jr. pleaded guilty providing false statements – admitting he lied to Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) agents when he falsely stated he did not provide a copy of downward departure motion to Texas Syndicate members. This document was used as the basis to order the murder of the government’s informant. On Feb. 22, 2011, Carcano was sentenced to 52 months custody and a three-year-term of supervised release.

The investigation leading to the federal charges and subsequent conviction of these admitted Texas Syndicate gang members was conducted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Office. Assistant United States Attorney Robert Wells, Jr. prosecuted the case.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Tahirah Carter Sentenced in Baltimore Federal Court to 135 months in Federal Prison for Conspiracy to Distribute and Possess with Intent to Distribute Heroin

August 23, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on August 22, 2011 released the following:

“Heroin Co-Conspirator Sentenced to Over 11 Years in Prison for Drug Trafficking

BALTIMORE—U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz sentenced Tahirah Carter, age 35, of Cockeysville, Maryland, today to 135 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release for conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute heroin.

The sentence was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein; Special Agent in Charge Richard A. McFeely of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; Acting Special Agent in Charge Jeannine A. Hammett of the Internal Revenue Service – Criminal Investigation, Washington, D.C. Field Office; Baltimore City State’s Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein; and Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III.

According to her plea agreement, from at least November 2005 to July 2008 Carter conspired with others to distribute heroin. Carter acted as a courier and point of contact for a conspirator’s source of supply in New York, traveling from Baltimore to New York to obtain kilogram quantities of heroin and transport cash for payment of the heroin. Carter admitted that her participation in the conspiracy resulted in the distribution of more than 30 kilograms of heroin.

Joy Edison, age 25, of Elkton, Maryland, pleaded guilty to her participation in the conspiracy and is scheduled to be sentenced on August 26, 2011 at 2:30 p.m.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein thanked Baltimore City Assistant State’s Attorneys Tony Gioia, Michael Studdard, and Tim Lake; the FBI; the IRS; and the Baltimore City Police Department for their assistance in this investigation and prosecution. Mr. Rosenstein commended Assistant United States Attorneys James G. Warwick and James T. Wallner, who prosecuted this Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force case.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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