Richard Bell, Robert Rogers, Jackiem Wright, and Reginald Berry are Charged in Separate Federal Criminal Informations with Alleged Wire Fraud, and Mr. Bell is Additionally Charged with Alleged Willfully Filing a False Federal Income Tax Return

December 1, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on November 30, 2011 released the following:

“Four Charged with Fraud on City Sheriff’s Department

PHILADELPHIA— Charges were filed today against four people involved in an alleged scheme to defraud the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office, announced United States Attorney Zane David Memeger. Separate informations[1] were filed against Richard Bell, Robert Rogers, Jackiem Wright, and Reginald Berry. Each of the defendants is charged with one count of wire fraud; Bell is additionally charged with willfully filing a false federal income tax return.

Bell was employed in the accounting department of the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office. According to the information, between 2007 and 2010, Bell wrote fraudulent checks drawn on bank accounts of the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office to unauthorized individuals and companies. Bell forwarded over $400,000 of those checks to Rogers. Rogers cashed the checks made payable to himself. Rogers forwarded the other checks to other individuals to cash or deposit. In particular, Rogers forwarded over $147,000 in checks made payable to one company to Wright and Berry. Wright and Berry deposited those checks into the company bank account, and withdrew or attempted to withdraw the proceeds. Bell, Rogers, Wright, and Berry shared the proceeds from their fraudulent checks.

It is further alleged that Bell assisted a person known to the United States Attorney in fraudulently purchasing properties at Sheriff’s sale for only 10 percent of the bid price. Bell carried out the scheme by removing the checks that the person submitted to the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office for the remaining ninety percent before the checks were deposited. For this, Bell allegedly charged and received a fee from the person.

Information Regarding the Defendants

Name Address Age
Richard Bell Philadelphia, PA 36
Reginald Berry Philadelphia, PA 29
Robert Rogers Philadelphia, PA 44
Jackiem Wright Philadelphia, PA 29

If convicted, Bell faces an advisory sentencing guideline range of 33 to 41 months in prison; Rogers faces an advisory sentencing guideline range of 27 to 33 months in prison; Wright and Berry each face an advisory sentencing guideline range of 15 to 21 months in prison.

The case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division, the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office, and the City of Philadelphia Office of Inspector General. The City of Philadelphia Office of the Controller has also assisted the investigation. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Sarah L. Grieb, Assistant United States Attorney Christopher Diviny, and Special Assistant United States Attorney Meriah Russell.

1 An indictment or information is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Several remain at large in Ark. corruption probe

October 12, 2011

The Associated Press (AP) on October 12, 2011 released the following:

“By NOMAAN MERCHANT, Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Federal officials continued their search Wednesday for several people who remained at large following a widespread crackdown on corruption that culminated in the arrests of dozens of others this week in eastern Arkansas.

FBI spokesman Steve Frazier said the bureau and other law enforcement agencies were still hunting for the last of the 70 people indicted on racketeering, money laundering and drug charges as part of the four-year investigation known as “Operation Delta Blues.” Five law enforcement officers were among those indicted.

Fifty-one people were arrested Tuesday, and another five were arrested Wednesday, including some who turned themselves in, Frazier said. Those detained were expected to appear Thursday morning in federal court.

U.S. Attorney Christopher Thyer said in an interview that he expected some defendants to take guilty pleas “relatively quickly.” He declined to say if any of the defendants had agreed to cooperate with the ongoing investigation.

“If they want their day in court, we’re willing to give it to them,” Thyer said.

News of the investigation rocked Helena-West Helena, a Mississippi Delta town plagued for years by crime, poverty and allegations of corruption. Some residents awoke Tuesday to the sound of helicopters buzzing overhead.

“I’m thankful,” said Linda Walters, a school bus driver who waited outside a press conference Tuesday afternoon after hearing the news.

She said the constant gunfire outside her home had forced her to look into moving to another city.

“I have to go sleep, hit the floor every time I hear a bullet shot,” she said. “I’m so upset.”

Helena-West Helena Mayor Arnell Willis sat next to reporters during the news conference. Willis had gone to Little Rock a month ago to plead with Thyer for federal help. Thyer didn’t tell Willis about Operation Delta Blues until Tuesday’s arrests, but Willis said he didn’t mind.

“Welcome to the dawning of a new day in the Delta,” he told reporters afterward.

The indictments accused the five officers of taking payments to guard shipments of cocaine and other drugs. Phillips County sheriff’s deputy Winston Dean Jackson is allegedly caught on a federal wiretap talking to another deputy about a payment by a defense lawyer in exchange for “failing to perform law enforcement duties.”

The unidentified deputy said the payment fell under “the good old boy” system and that anyone not involved would “get rolled over.”

Thyer would not comment on any future indictments but said the investigation was still ongoing.

According to the indictment, Jackson responded, “You get rolled over, exactly. Cause nobody say … ain’t nothing but the good old boy system.”

Helena-West Helena police officers Herman Eaton, Robert “Bam Bam” Rogers and Marlene Kalb allegedly escorted drug shipments, each receiving $500 from someone posing as a drug dealer. A Marvell police officer, Robert Wahls, is charged with accepting money from an informant and escorting a drug shipment.

It was not immediately clear if the five officers had attorneys yet. Relatives of the officers could not be reached. The federal public defender’s office in Little Rock did not return requests for comment.

Hundreds of officers from the FBI, Arkansas State Police and other agencies helped make Tuesday’s arrests. An FBI special agent was shot during one arrest, but was not seriously injured and later released from the hospital.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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