Robert Maday Indicted in Alleged Escape and Armed Bank Robbery in 2009

December 2, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on December 2, 2011 released the following:

“CHICAGO— A Chicago area man who allegedly escaped from custody in Rolling Meadows and a day later committed an armed bank robbery in Bloomingdale before being recaptured was indicted on federal charges in connection with the alleged series of events in September 2009. The defendant, Robert Maday, was charged with escape, armed bank robbery, being a felon-in-possession of firearms, and two counts of using firearms during violent crimes in a five-count indictment that was returned by a federal grand jury late yesterday, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; and Robert D. Grant, Special Agent in Charge of the Chicago Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, announced today.

Maday, 41, formerly of Elk Grove Village, has remained in federal custody since he was recaptured on Sept. 18, 2009. He will be arraigned on a date still to be determined in U.S. District Court. Maday faces a mandatory minimum of 45 years and a maximum sentence up to life in prison if convicted of the three gun counts alone.

On Sept. 17, 2009, Maday was under a federal detention order when he allegedly escaped from the custody of two Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office investigators who were transporting him to the Cook County Courthouse in Rolling Meadows. One gun count alleges that Maday used two firearms during the escape—a Heckler and Koch USP .40-caliber semi-automatic pistol and a Smith and Wesson .38-caliber SPL revolver.

On Sept. 18, 2009, Maday allegedly took approximately $32,975 in the armed robbery of the First American Bank branch, located at 80 Stratford Dr., in Bloomingdale. A second gun count alleges that Maday used the same two firearms during the bank robbery. A third gun count alleges that Maday illegally possessed both weapons after having previously been convicted of a felony. The indictment seeks forfeiture of both weapons and 18 rounds of ammunition that were seized when Maday was arrested. He was apprehended after leading police on a high-speed chase and crashing a stolen car on Illinois Highway 59 in West Chicago.

The armed bank robbery count carries a maximum sentence of 25 years and the escape count carries a maximum of five years in prison. The felon-in-possession of a firearm count alleges that Maday would be eligible to be sentenced as an armed career criminal, which carries a mandatory minimum 15-year prison term. A first conviction for using a firearm during a violent crime carries a mandatory consecutive term of five years in prison and conviction on a second count carries a mandatory consecutive sentence of 25 years in prison, with a maximum of any number of years up to life. If convicted, the court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal sentencing statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

The government is being represented in court by Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrianna Kastanek. The public is reminded that an indictment contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Maurice Leon Wiggins Indicted by a Chicago Federal Grand Jury for Allegedly Making a Bomb Threat Targeting Southern Illinois University in Carbondale

September 13, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on September 12, 2011 released the following:

“Chicago Man Indicted for Making Bomb Threat Targeting Southern Illinois University in Carbondale

A Chicago resident is charged with willfully making a bomb threat to the Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Illinois, Stephen R. Wigginton announced today. Maurice Leon Wiggins, 23, was indicted by a federal grand jury on September 8, 2011. The grand jury returned an indictment charging Wiggins with willfully making a bomb threat. The indictment alleged that on August 29, 2011, Wiggins accessed the Internet from his cellular phone and submitted a message to the Southern Illinois University campus crime watch webpage for the Carbondale campus. His message stated that he planned to kill 4,000 students and staff by bombing three dormitories and a student center between September and November 2011.

Note: An indictment is a formal charge against a defendant. Under the law, a defendant is presumed to be innocent until proved guilty beyond a reasonable doubt to the satisfaction of a jury.

“With the somber remembrance of 9.11 in our hearts, and the school tragedy at Northern Illinois University always on our minds, my office does not take terroristic threats against our citizens, our schools, or our children lightly,” said United States Attorney Wigginton.

The indictment charges the offense of willfully making a threat, which carries a maximum sentence of 10 years’ imprisonment, $250,000 fine, or both, and three years’ supervised release. Today, Wiggins was arrested and had his initial appearance before the federal district court in Chicago.

This investigation was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Southern Illinois University Police Department. The case is being handled by Assistant United States Attorney Liam Coonan.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Robert D. Falor Indicited by a Chicago Federal Grand Jury for Alleged Federal Tax Evasion

September 2, 2011

The U.S. Attorney’s Office Northern District of Illinois on September 1, 2011 released the following:

“FORMER CONDO-HOTEL DEVELOPER ARRESTED ON FEDERAL CHARGES ALLEGING EVASION OF MORE THAN $1.75 MILLION IN INCOME TAXES

CHICAGO — A former real estate developer who attempted to convert hotels in Chicago, Miami Beach and elsewhere into condominium-hotels was arrested today on federal tax evasion charges alleging that he failed to pay more than $1.75 million in taxes covering three years between 2004 and 2007. The defendant, Robert D. Falor, who was the chief operator and manager of The Falor Companies, Inc. (TFC), was charged with three counts of federal income tax evasion in an indictment that was returned by a federal grand jury on Tuesday and unsealed today following his arrest.

Falor, 43, of Chicago and formerly of Glencoe, pleaded not guilty at his arraignment this morning before U.S. District Judge Virginia Kendall, who scheduled a detention hearing for 10 a.m. tomorrow in Federal Court in Chicago.

The arrest and charges were announced by Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; Alvin Patton, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division in Chicago; and Thomas P. Brady, Inspector-in-Charge of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service in Chicago. The investigation is continuing, they said.

According to the indictment, Falor was an owner of multiple businesses, including limited liability companies, that he and others created to own and manage the affairs of various TFC condohotel properties. In converting hotels to condo-hotels, individual guest rooms would be sold to investors as separately titled condominium units and rented by a TFC-related hotel management company to guests when the owner was not in residence, with the owner receiving a percentage of the rental fee.

Falor operated multiple condo-hotel ventures in the mid-2000s, including the Blake Hotel, located at 500 S. Dearborn St., in Chicago, and the Tides Hotel on Ocean Drive in Miami Beach, but TFC ceased business operations in 2006, according to the indictment.

The tax evasion counts allege that Falor failed to pay the following amounts in federal income taxes: $189,246 for calendar year 2004; $494,261 for calendar year 2006; and $1,091,216 for calendar year 2007, resulting in a total of $1,774,723 in unpaid taxes. For 2006 and 2007, Falor allegedly evaded taxes, in part, by failing to file federal individual income tax returns. For 2004, he filed a tax return in October 2007 that allegedly under-reported his income and the amount of taxes he owed.

During 2007, the indictment alleges that Falor had two sources of unreported taxable income: more than $2.3 million from the Blake Hotel and more than $2.9 million in capital gains resulting from the dissolution of certain limited liability companies. Falor allegedly deposited the $2.3 million of income from the Blake Hotel into various bank accounts through a series of more than 200 banking transactions. During 2007, he had taxable income of approximately $4,837,308, on which he owed income tax of approximately $1,091,216, the indictment charges, adding that he failed to file a return or pay any taxes by the deadline.

During 2006, Falor allegedly received taxable income of more than $1.25 million from the Blake Hotel. In addition, more than $1.65 million in loans from TFC became taxable income to Falor in 2006 because he failed to repay the loans when TFC ceased operations. The loans had accrued to Falor between 2003 and 2006 when he directed TFC employees to pay his personal expenses from company accounts and to record the payments as loans, the indictment states. During 2006, he had taxable income of approximately $1,825,326, on which he owed income tax of approximately $494,261, the indictment charges, adding that he failed to file a return or pay any taxes by the deadline.

During 2004, the indictment alleges that Falor had three sources of unreported taxable income: approximately $1,294,424 in capital gains from the sale of certain interests in limited liability companies; approximately $472,955 in capital gains from a distribution from a limited liability company that participate din the management of the Tides Hotel; and at least $201,485 from certain companies that he deposited into a bank account he controlled. During 2004, he had taxable income of approximately $1,332,391, on which he owed income tax of approximately $189,246, the indictment charges. On Oct. 3, 2007, Falor allegedly filed an income tax return for 2004 that reported no capital gains and under-reported his income from various companies, resulting in a tax due of only $2,102, when he actually owed the greater amount of approximately $189,246.

The government is being represented by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Ryan S. Hedges and Barry Jonas.

Each count of tax evasion carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. In addition, defendants convicted of tax offenses face mandatory costs of prosecution and remain civilly liable to the Government for any and all back taxes, as well as a civil fraud penalty of 75 percent of the underpayment plus interest. If convicted, the Court, must impose a reasonable sentence under the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

The public is reminded that an indictment contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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