A Texas Federal Grand Jury Has Indicted an Individual for Allegedly Aiming a Laser Pointer at an Aircraft

August 25, 2014

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on August 22, 2014 released the following:

Former Garland, Texas Man Indicted for Aiming a Laser Pointer at an Aircraft

DALLAS—A federal grand jury has indicted Steven Alexander Chavez, Jr., 23, on one count of aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft, announced U.S. Attorney Sarah R. Saldaña of the Northern District of Texas.

Today, special agents with the FBI arrested Chavez in Lubbock, Texas, where he had recently relocated from Garland, Texas.

According to the indictment, returned earlier this week in Dallas, on or about August 24, 2013, in the Dallas Division of the Northern District of Texas, Chavez knowingly aimed the beam of a laser pointer at a Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) helicopter.

A federal indictment is an accusation by a grand jury and a defendant is entitled to the presumption of innocence unless proven guilty. If convicted, however, the maximum statutory penalty is five years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

The FBI, Texas DPS and Garland Police Department are investigating. Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Lara Burns is prosecuting.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

Federal Crimes – Appeal

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


“Dallas County Man Charged in Federal Complaint with Unlawfully Entering Restricted Area of Dallas Love Field Airport”

May 2, 2013

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on May 1, 2013 released the following:

“DALLAS— Ruben Jimenez Martinez, 36, of Garland, Texas, appeared in federal court this afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Irma C. Ramirez on a federal criminal complaint stemming from his unauthorized entrance into a restricted area of Dallas Love Field Airport on Sunday evening, April 28, 2013. He was ordered detained. Today’s announcement was made by U.S. Attorney Sarah R. Saldaña of the Northern District of Texas.

Specifically, the felony complaint charges Jimenez with entering aircraft or an airport area in violation of security requirements. The offense as charged, upon conviction, carries a maximum statutory penalty of up to 10 years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

According to the complaint filed, Jimenez, driving a 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe, pulled onto the Dallas Love Field Airport property where private aircrafts are housed. Jimenez approached the gate of a general aviation aircraft business and began pressing buttons on the gate’s access pad. While an employee opened the gate to engage Jimenez through the vehicle’s window, another employee parked his company SUV on the air operations side of the gate to prevent unauthorized vehicles from entering the restricted area. As that employee began to open the door of his vehicle, Jimenez evaded the vehicle and maneuvered around it at a high rate of speed.

Jimenez proceeded onto and down Taxiway Alpha at speeds estimated to be in excess of 100 miles per hour. The business’ employees were unable to catch up with Jimenez and requested assistance. Jimenez’s Tahoe was ultimately located at Associated Air Hanger 3. Jimenez walked through the hanger and, when officers with the Dallas Police Department arrived and cuffed him, he attempted to break free and additional officers arrived to assist in restraining him. Jimenez was arrested and agreed to speak to law enforcement. He advised that he believed God had directed him to Dallas Love Field and, that while he was in the hanger, he yelled “in the name of Jesus” three times.

A federal criminal complaint is a written statement of the essential facts of the offense charged and must be made under oath before a magistrate judge. The U.S. Attorney’s office has 30 days to present the matter to a grand jury for indictment. A defendant is entitled to the presumption of innocence until proven guilty.

The matter is being investigated by the FBI, the Transportation Security Administration, the Federal Air Marshal Service, and the Dallas Police Department.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Errin Martin is in charge of the prosecution.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Feds: Chicago Bears Receiver Sam Hurd Allegedly Sought to Buy Large Amount of Drugs

December 16, 2011
Sam Hurd
Bears WR Sam Hurd (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Tribune photo)

Chicago Tribune on December 15, 2011 released the following:

“By Jeremy Gorner and Vaughn McClure, Tribune reporters

Chicago Bears receiver Sam Hurd was arrested Wednesday night outside a Rosemont restaurant after he accepted a kilogram of cocaine from a confidential informant and an undercover federal agent posing as a drug supplier, according to federal charges filed Thursday in Dallas.

Hurd was charged with one count of conspiring to possess half a kilogram of cocaine with the intent to distribute it. Hurd appeared in federal court in Chicago in late afternoon and will remain in custody overnight while his attorney arranges bond.

Hurd, dressed in street clothes — fashionable jeans and a gray T-shirt — stood ramrod straight in front of the judge and replied, “Yes, sir,” to various questions about whether he understood his rights.

At the Wednesday night meeting, authorities allege that Hurd negotiated to buy five to 10 kilograms of cocaine and 1,000 pounds of marijuana a week for distribution in the Chicago area. He agreed to pay $25,000 for each kilogram of cocaine and $450 a pound for the marijuana, according to the charges.

Hurd said at the meeting that he plays for the Bears, gets out of practice at about 5:30 p.m., and would pay them on the next day, authorities said. Bears players are paid on Thursdays.

Hurd told the undercover agent and informant that he and someone else distributed about four kilograms of cocaine each week in the Chicago area but that their supplier wasn’t able to meet their needs, according to the criminal complaint.

The Bears issued the following statement: “We are aware of Sam’s arrest and are continuing to gather details surrounding it. We are disappointed whenever these circumstances arise. We will deal with them appropriately once we have all the information.”

Bears coach Lovie Smith said after practice Thursday that Hurd remains a member of the team.

“I am in shock over it,” Smith said. “Never saw it coming. My dealings with Sam here as most of you would probably say the same has all been good. He’s a guy that showed up every day to go to work.”

Hurd, who played at Northern Illinois, signed a three-year contract with the Bears this offseason after playing the previous five seasons with the Dallas Cowboys. The veteran receiver has been primarily a special teams contributor for the Bears.

Bears receiver Roy Williams, who played with Hurd for three seasons with the Cowboys, said he was “shocked” by the news.

“It’s a situation I don’t want anyone to be in, especially a close friend, a teammate that I have been playing with now for four or five years now, especially a guy from Texas with a wife and daughter,” Williams said Thursday at Halas Hall. “So, it’s tough for me just because I am not into drugs or anything like that. I know it has to be tough for him because he has his family. It’s a choice he made and there are consequences with choices that you make.”

Asked for his thoughts about Hurd, Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher said, “It’s sad for him. I’m not sure what’s going on, but you never want to hear about one of your teammates, something like this happening to them.

“He’s a good teammate. That’s what I know of him. He comes to work every day and works hard. Outside of here, I don’t know him very well. But he comes to work every day and practices hard and plays hard. That’s all I know of him. He’s a friendly guy.”

Hurd was inactive for the season opener against the Atlanta Falcons because of a sprained ankle, and has eight receptions for 109 yards on the season.

The complaint alleged that Hurd first came to the attention of federal authorities in July when the confidential informant tipped off agents that a man — later learned to be a Hurd associate — was attempting to coordinate the purchase of about four kilograms of cocaine in the Dallas area. The associate wanted to complete the deal that day so the buyer could transport the cocaine to a northern destination that same day, authorities charged.

At the direction of authorities, the informant met with the Hurd associate. After the meeting, Dallas County police conducted a traffic stop of the Hurd associate and recovered $88,000 in cash and a marijuana plant.

Hurd, who owned the vehicle pulled over by police, later reached out to federal agents and claimed that he had placed the $88,000 into the vehicle and then turned over the vehicle to the associate — who worked at a car repair shop — for maintenance and detailing work, according to the charges.

Hurd produced a bank statement that he said showed he had withdrawn the $88,000 from his account, but authorities said the statement did not reflect that size of a withdrawal.

Hurd’s three-year contract with the Bears had a maximum value of $5.15 million ($4.15 million base total), and Hurd received a $1.35 million signing bonus. His base pay this season was $685,000. The Bears could pursue trying to recover some of the signing bonus.

The investigation is being handled by the U.S. Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Dallas.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Two Dallas-Area Residents Charged in Nationwide Medicare Fraud Strike Force Takedown

September 8, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation on September 7, 2011 released the following:

“DALLAS—A Dallas-area doctor appeared in federal court today on charges related to his alleged participation in a scheme to defraud the Medicare and Medicaid programs, announced the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services (HHS). His physician’s assistant, who joined the scheme at a later date, appeared in federal court with the doctor.

These charges are part of a nationwide takedown by Medicare Fraud Strike Force operations that led to charges against 70 defendants for their alleged participation in schemes to collectively submit more than $263.6 million in false billings to the Medicare program. As part of takedown operations last week, 18 additional defendants were charged in Detroit and one defendant was charged in Miami, in cases unsealed on Sept. 1, 2011, for their alleged roles involving Medicare fraud schemes involving approximately $29.4 million in fraudulent claims. This coordinated takedown involved the highest amount of false Medicare billings in a single takedown in Strike Force history.

“The defendants charged in this takedown are accused of stealing precious taxpayer resources and defrauding Medicare—jeopardizing the integrity of our health care system and our nation’s most critical health care program for personal gain,” said Attorney General Holder. “Our highly coordinated, nationwide Strike Force operations are working aggressively to combat Medicare fraud and our anti-health care fraud efforts have never been more innovative, collaborative, aggressive—or effective. We will continue to work with our law enforcement partners and partners across government to fight against health care fraud.”

U.S. Attorney Jacks said, “The Dallas Strike Force continues to aggressively root out and prosecute those involved in committing heath care fraud, which costs taxpayers, patients and private insurers millions of dollars each year. Health care fraud has infiltrated every layer of the health care industry, and in this case, as in many, a physician is allegedly at the core of the scheme. Health care providers should take heed—these strike forces mean business and are committed to prosecuting those who cheat the system.”

Physician Daniel K. Leong, 53, and his physician’s assistant, Cal Graves, 31, are charged in a seven-count indictment with conspiracy to commit health care fraud and health care fraud for their roles in a Medicare and Medicaid fraud scheme involving prescription drugs and diagnostic testing at their practice in the South Dallas Community Medical Center, on Martin Luther King Blvd.

Since their inception in March 2007, Strike Force operations in nine districts have obtained indictments of more than 1,140 individuals who collectively have falsely billed the Medicare program for more than $2.9 billion. In addition, the HHS Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in conjunction with the HHS-OIG, are taking steps to increase accountability and decrease the presence of fraudulent providers.

The results of the nationwide takedown were announced today by Attorney General Holder, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, FBI Director Robert S. Mueller, Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division and Inspector General Daniel R. Levinson of the HHS Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG). The Dallas indictments were announced by U.S. Attorney James T. Jacks of the Northern District of Texas; Special Agent in Charge Robert E. Casey, Jr. of the FBI’s Dallas Field Office; Special Agent in Charge Mike Fields of the Dallas Regional Office of HHS-OIG, Office of Investigations; and the Texas Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU).

An indictment is merely a charge and defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty. Leong and Graves are each charged with one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud. In addition, Leong is charged with six substantive counts of health care fraud and Graves is charged with four substantive counts of health care fraud. If convicted, each count carries a maximum statutory sentence of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. In addition, restitution could be ordered.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael McCarthy.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Kenneth Wayne Brown, Duane Milford Stailey, and Sharon Ware Stailey are Indicted by a Dallas Federal Grand Jury and Are Each Charged Conspiracy to Commit Theft From a Program Receiving Federal Funds

August 25, 2011

The U.S. Attorney’s Office Northern District of Texas on August 24, 2011 released the following:

“FEDERAL GRAND JURY INDICTS ADDITIONAL DEFENDANTS FOR ROLE IN CONSPIRACY TO EMBEZZLE FROM CITY OF GARLAND, TEXAS

Former City of Garland Employee, Patricia Leathers, is Currently Serving a 57-Month Prison Sentence for Her Role in the Conspiracy

DALLAS — A federal grand jury in Dallas has indicted three defendants for their role in a conspiracy to embezzle from the City of Garland, Texas, announced U.S. Attorney James T. Jacks of the Northern District of Texas. Kenneth Wayne Brown, 50, of Denison, Texas; Duane Milford Stailey, 44, and his wife, Sharon Ware Stailey, 45, both of Leonard, Texas, are each charged with one count of conspiracy to commit theft from a program receiving federal funds.

Patricia Leathers, 63, of Rowlett, Texas, a former risk management adjustor for the City of Garland, pleaded guilty in December 2010 to the same offense. She is presently serving a 57-month sentence at the Federal Medical Center Carswell in Fort Worth, Texas. Leathers was also ordered to pay $1,968,479 in restitution to the City of Garland. Leathers’ sister, Connie M. Powell, 60, of Garland, also pleaded guilty to her role in the conspiracy. She was sentenced to a three-year term of probation and ordered to pay $64,142 in restitution.

The indictment alleges that from August 1999 through March 2008, the three defendants conspired with each other and others to embezzle from the City of Garland by creating false claims for damage and repairs to personal and real property. The reimbursement checks, issued in the true names of the defendants, as well as fictitious names, were cashed by the defendants who then shared the proceeds with Leathers.

According to the indictment, Brown endorsed and negotiated at least 14 City of Garland checks, totaling more than $102,000. In addition, Duane and Sharon Stailey fraudulently negotiated and shared in the proceeds of City of Garland checks totaling at least $482,000 of which they deposited more than $129,000 into their joint bank account.

An indictment is an accusation by a federal grand jury, and a defendant is entitled to the presumption of innocence unless proven guilty. However, if convicted, each face a maximum statutory sentence of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Restitution could be ordered.

The investigation was conducted by the FBI, the Garland Police Department, and the Garland Offices of the City Attorney and Internal Auditor. Assistant U.S. Attorney Katherine Miller is prosecuting the case.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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