Drug Trafficking Conspiracy Indictment Expanded

January 27, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on January 26, 2012 released the following:

“ANCHORAGE— United States Attorney Karen L. Loeffler announced today, January 26, 2012, that on January 20, 2012, an Anchorage grand jury expanded a previously charged drug trafficking conspiracy involving Kostas Nikolaos Bairamis, Melissa Dawn Cue, BJ Griffith, William Gilbert, and Justin Clayton Ray Lane to charge three additional defendants: Homer resident Timothy Daniel Cissney, age 33; Christopher Sean Kendrick, age 36, from California; and Aaron O’Kito Dyson, aka “Punchy,” age 37, from Washington. The indictment alleges one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, in violation of 21 U.S.C. §§ 846, 841(a)(1), (b)(1)(C).

According to the indictment presented to the court, defendants conspired to distribute oxycodone and methadone between at least June 17, 2010, and October 5, 2010. Bairamis has been convicted of conspiring to distribute methamphetamine during a different time period and has been sentenced to served 11 years on that separate charge. Both Cue and Griffith have been previously indicted by a grand jury in the District of Nevada. Those charges remain pending.

Assistant United States Attorney Kimberly Sayers-Fay, who presented the case to the grand jury, advised that the maximum penalties for conspiring to distribute oxycodone and methadone are 20 years’ imprisonment, a $1,000,000 fine, three years’ supervised release, and a $100 special assessment.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and Alaska State Troopers conducted the investigation the led to the indictments in this case.

An indictment is only a charge and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government must prove guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


12 Charged in Alleged Panamanian Drug Trafficking Conspiracy

December 23, 2011

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on December 22, 2011 released the following:

“WILMINGTON, Del. – Twelve individuals from the Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland – and the country of Panama – have been charged in a 20-count indictment alleging international drug trafficking. The charges result from an extensive investigation conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The nearly three-year investigation involved federal and local law enforcement agencies in the United States and Panama.

U.S. Attorney Charles M. Oberly, III, District of Delaware, announced that each defendant faces two counts of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine and one kilogram or more of heroin. The indictment also charges them with conspiracy to smuggle five kilograms of cocaine and one kilogram or more of heroin into the United States.

“This investigation is a terrific example of how federal, state and local law enforcement, with support from our partners abroad, were able to successfully dismantle a major narcotics smuggling organization,” said John P. Kelleghan, special agent in charge of ICE HSI in Philadelphia. “HSI will continue to utilize its broad authorities to target those individuals that pose direct threats to our communities.”

For each of the offenses, the defendants face a maximum term of life in prison, with a mandatory minimum term of 10 years in prison.

Charged in the indictment are:

  • Efrain Dixon, 31, of Colon, Panama;
  • Ronaldo Edmund, 36, of Wilmington;
  • Kelvin Cook, 33, of Newark, Del.;
  • Julio Archer, 39, of Philadelphia;
  • Benjamin Carpenter, of Colon, Panama;
  • Roumik K. Banerjee, 24, of Kennett Square, Pa.;
  • Mia Poteat, 21, of New Castle, Del.;
  • Tina Simmons, 23, of Wilmington;
  • Sharon Butera, 51, of Elkton, Md.;
  • Dynisha J. Revel, 22, of Newark, Del.;
  • Raabia H. Munjir, 27, of Lansdowne, Pa.; and
  • Tessa Kay Snyder, 46, of North East, Md.

According to the indictment and court statements, U.S.-based defendants Edmund, Cook and Archer recruited primarily female couriers to travel to Panama to smuggle multiple kilograms of heroin and cocaine from Panama to the United States. Once in Panama, the couriers met with Panama-based defendants Carpenter and Dixon, where they were outfitted with cocaine and heroin. Most of the couriers smuggled the drugs in small compartments sewn into Lycra shorts in an effort to avoid law enforcement detection. After a number of couriers using that method were arrested, the organization began concealing the drugs within hair weaves and wigs. Regardless of the smuggling methods, once the couriers received the drugs they traveled by bus or airplane to Mexico, where they ultimately crossed or attempted to cross the U.S. border in Texas border towns.

“This case shows how international drug traffickers have a direct and significant impact upon our local communities, such as Wilmington, Delaware and Cecil County, Maryland,” said DEA Acting Special Agent in Charge Vito Guarino. “Due to the cooperative efforts of the DEA and its law enforcement partners, a major regional smuggling organization has been identified, and its members brought to justice. In this instance, the defendants used well-planned techniques to smuggle large amounts of cocaine and heroin into the region over an extended period. However, their efforts failed due the combined efforts of the participating law enforcement agencies. DEA will continue to work with our law enforcement partners to arrest those individuals responsible for distributing illegal controlled substances in the region.””

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Former Arizona Army National Guard Member Charged with Allegedly Participating in Bribery and Drug Trafficking Conspiracy

November 12, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on November 10, 2011 released the following:

“WASHINGTON— A former member of the Arizona Army National Guard was charged today for his alleged role in a widespread bribery and illegal drug trafficking conspiracy that operated from January 2002 through March 2004, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division.

The 10-count indictment returned today in U.S. District Court in Arizona charges Adalberto Valenzuela, 31, of Tucson, Ariz., with two counts of conspiracy, two counts of bribery, two counts of bribery involving programs receiving federal funds, two counts of Hobbs Act extortion under color of official right and two counts of possession with intent to distribute cocaine. The charges arise from Operation Lively Green, an undercover FBI investigation that began in December 2001.

According to the indictment, Valenzuela was a corporal in the Arizona Army National Guard at the time he participated in the conspiracy. Valenzuela allegedly conspired to enrich himself by obtaining cash bribes from individuals he believed to be illegal narcotics traffickers, but who were actually FBI agents. The indictment alleges that in return for the bribes, Valenzuela used his official position as a corporal in the Arizona Army National Guard to assist, protect and participate in the activities of an illegal narcotics trafficking organization that was transporting and distributing cocaine within Arizona and from Arizona to other locations in the southwestern United States. In order to protect the shipments of cocaine, Valenzuela allegedly wore official uniforms and carried official forms of identification, used official vehicles, and used his official authority where necessary to prevent police stops, searches and seizures of the narcotics.

According to the indictment, Valenzuela transported cocaine on two separate occasions and, as a result, received bribe payments totaling $7,000 for the 40 kilograms of cocaine involved.

In 2006, an arrest warrant was issued for Valenzuela. Repeated attempts to locate and contact him have been unsuccessful. Valenzuela is now considered a fugitive and anyone with information regarding his whereabouts is encouraged to contact their local FBI office.

If convicted on the conspiracy charges, Valenzuela faces a maximum of five years in prison. The bribery and Hobbs Act charges each carry maximum prison sentences of 20 years. The federal program bribery charges each carry a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, as do each of the drug conspiracy and possession charges. Valenzuela also faces a maximum $250,000 fine for each charged count.

To date, 57 additional defendants have been convicted and sentenced on related charges as part of Operation Lively Green. An additional 14 defendants have pleaded guilty in the Western District of Oklahoma in a related investigation known as Operation Tarnish Star.

Operation Lively Green cases are part of a joint investigation being conducted by the Southern Arizona Corruption Task Force (SACTF), which includes the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, and the Tucson Police Department. The Arizona Air National Guard, Air Force Office of Special Investigations, Defense Criminal Investigative Service and the Criminal Investigation Division of the Internal Revenue Service are also participating in the investigation.

The case is prosecuted by Trial Attorneys Peter Koski and Monique Abrishami of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section.

An indictment is a formal accusation of criminal conduct, not evidence. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until convicted through due process of law.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Neal Indravadan Desai and Patrick Fernand Brupbacher Sentenced In Beaumont Federal Court to Federal Drug Trafficking Conspiracy

August 11, 2011

The U.S. Attorney’s Office Eastern District of Texas on August 10, 2011 released the following:

“Houston Men Sentenced In Federal Drug Trafficking Conspiracy

BEAUMONT, Texas – U.S. Attorney John M. Bales announced that two Houston men have been sentenced to federal prison for their roles in a major drug trafficking conspiracy. The sentencing hearings were held today before U.S. District Judge Ron Clark in the Eastern District of Texas.

Neal Indravadan Desai, 37, of Houston, pleaded guilty on Feb. 1, 2011, to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine and was sentenced to 151 months in federal prison today.

Patrick Fernand Brupbacher, 34, of Houston, pleaded guilty on Jan. 18, 2011, to using a telephone to further the conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine and was sentenced to 48 months in federal prison today.

According to information presented in court, in August 2008, an investigation began into a Houston-based drug trafficking organization that was distributing large quantities of methamphetamine and cocaine throughout Houston and the Beaumont, Texas area. In June 2009, agents began utilizing court-ordered telephone intercepts in an effort to determine those involved in the conspiracy, the amount of drugs being distributed and the source of the drugs. Law enforcement officers and agents also participated in undercover purchases of methamphetamine and revealed at least 40 persons were involved in the conspiracy and that no less that 113 pounds of methamphetamine and 31 kilograms of cocaine were distributed. At least 20 kilograms of cocaine was seized through undercover buys and during the execution of search warrants and arrests. A federal grand jury returned an indictment on June 3, 2010, charging 35 defendants with various drug trafficking charges. An additional five defendants were named in a superseding indictment on Nov. 3, 2010. All defendants have since been convicted.

This case is being investigated by the DEA, ICE, ATF, Texas Department of Public Safety, Orange County Sheriff’s Office, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, the Chambers County Sheriff’s Office, the Beaumont Police Department, U.S. Marshal’s Service, Brazoria County Sheriff’s Office, Galveston County Sheriff’s Office, Galveston Police Department, Houston Police Department and the Texas Rangers. This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Michelle Englade.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Members of Alleged Asian Organized Crime Organization Appear in Federal Court Today

July 12, 2011

The U.S. Attorney’s Office District of Massachusetts on July 12, 2011 released the following:

“Detention Hearing Scheduled for Five Defendants Today at Noon

BOSTON, Mass. – Five federal defendants are scheduled to appear in U.S. District Court in Boston today, following a multi-year federal investigation into their roles in illegal activity in Chinatown and elsewhere. A total of 26 individuals from Massachusetts, Florida and Rhode Island have been indicted in connection with the alleged organized crime conspiracy.

According to court filings, the FBI’s Organized Crime Task Force led a long-term investigation into drug-trafficking, illegal gambling, extortion, prostitution, and other criminal activity in the Chinatown area of Boston and elsewhere. The investigation included court-authorized wire surveillance of cellular telephones for seven months, including the cell phones of five of the defendants. The investigation to date has resulted in the seizure of more than $340,000, thirteen firearms and approximately 12,000 pills of suspected oxycodone. Investigators also uncovered extensive evidence of illegal gambling and prostitution, and the use of extortionate threats to collect loans to gamblers and others.

“Organized crime can paralyze or seriously disrupt small communities, particularly close-knit neighborhoods like Chinatown,” said U.S. Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz. “This criminal organization is alleged to have trafficked large amounts of drugs, threatened and beat up individuals who failed to pay off large illegal debts, and moved women around the country to work in their brothels.”

“We encourage the victims of these alleged crimes to contact us to assist in protecting the community and prosecuting those responsible,” added U.S. Attorney Ortiz. “We are very fortunate in Massachusetts to have dedicated prosecutors, agents and local law enforcement who challenge themselves and creatively leverage resources to work these multi-faceted complex investigations.”

Richard DesLauriers, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division, said, “The indictments and arrests stemming from this operation send a clear message to those involved in organized crime organizations everywhere: The FBI and its law enforcement partners will pursue those who engage in drug dealing, illegal gambling, extortion and exploitation of women regardless of the geographic boundaries.”

SAC DesLauriers added, “In this case, law enforcement’s jurisdictional reach and investigative tenacity culminated in the arrest of multiple individuals. The methodical nature and duration of this investigation reflects our collective dedicated effort to secure justice for the victims. Organized crime groups are emerging from every corner of the globe. Through our task-force and intelligence based model, we will use every tool at our disposal to disrupt and dismantle organized criminal enterprises.”

In late May, 13 men and women were charged in the first of three indictments with conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute oxycodone, marijuana and human growth hormone in the Massachusetts, Florida, South Carolina, and elsewhere. According to an affidavit filed in connection with detention proceedings, John Willis, 40, of Dorchester, also known as “Bac Guai John” (“White Devil John”), the leader of this drug-trafficking conspiracy, has a long history of involvement in Asian organized crime.

The following were also charged in the drug-trafficking conspiracy with Willis: Brant Welty, 39, Kevin Baranowski, 41, and Bridget Welty, 38, all of Boston; Vincent Alberico, 29, of Centerville, Mass.; Peter Melendez, 50, of Sunrise, Florida; Aibun Eng, 38,and Steven Le, 21, both of Quincy; Brian Bowes, 42, and Michael Clemente, 29, both of Sunrise, Florida; Michael Shaw, 39, of Wilton Manors, Florida; Mark Thompson, 28, of Davie, Florida; and Anevay Duffy, 25, of Cumberland, Rhode Island. Alberico is also charged with assaulting a federal official who was performing his official duties.

With the exception of Melendez, the defendants in this matter have been arrested. Willis, Le, and Alberico have been detained pending trial. Brant Welty remains in custody pending the court’s decision on the government’s motion for detention and Baranowski remains in custody pending a detention hearing on July 14. Alberico is in state custody.

If convicted on these charges, Willis and Baranowski face up to 30 years in federal prison. Each of the remaining defendants faces up to 20 years in federal prison to be followed by up to a life term of supervised release, and $1 million fine. In addition, Alberico also faces up to eight years in federal prison to be followed by up to three years of supervised release, and a $250,000 fine for the assault charge.

On June 30, 13 additional defendants were charged in two separate indictments. One of the indictments charged Minh Cam Luong, 46, Vapeng Joe, 44, Hin Pau, 45, Judy Huyen Truong, 41, and Hui Zhou, 24, all of Quincy; Jian Ming Chen, 38, of Brighton; Elburke Lamson, 47, of Chelsea; Tan Ngo, 54, of Waltham; Songzeng Cao, 28, of Malden; and Yao Zheng Cao, 23, of Somerville, for operating an illegal gambling business since January 2010. That business has been based, since November 2010, at a illegal gambling den at 17-23 Beach Street in Chinatown. Luong, Pau, Songzeng Cao, Yao Zheng Cao and Zhou were also charged with using extortionate means, including threats or actual use of violence, to collect debts, including debts owed to the illegal gambling business. With the exception of Lamson and Truong, all defendants are currently in custody pending detention hearings. Five defendants are expected to have detention hearings today at noon.

According to a court filing, Luong and Ngo were both members of Chinatown’s Ping On Gang in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when the Gang was vying for control of crime in Chinatown. Both were convicted on federal charges including heroin trafficking, and both have served sentences in federal prison.

If convicted on these charges, each of the defendants faces up to five years in federal prison to be followed by up to three years of supervised release, and a $250,000 fine on the illegal gambling business charge. Luong, Pau, Cao, Cao, and Zhou also face up to 20 years in federal prison to be followed by up to three years of supervised release, and a $250,000 fine for each count of using extortionate means to collect extensions of credit.

Lastly, Wei Xing Chen, 50, of Cambridge, and Yue Q. He, age unknown, of Boston, were charged in an indictment with conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and 1-benzylpiperazine, both also known as ecstasy, and possession with intent to distribute 1-benzylpiperazine. In addition, Chen, He and Xiaohong Xue, 41, also of Cambridge, were charged in the same indictment with conspiring to induce travel to engage in prostitution. Chen, who operated brothels in Cambridge and Boston, is currently in custody. Arrest warrants have been issued for He and Xue.

If convicted on the drug charges, Chen and He face up to 20 years in federal prison to be followed by at least three years of supervised release, and a $1 million fine on each count. In addition, if convicted of prostitution conspiracy, each of the defendants faces up to five years in federal prison to be followed by up to three years of supervised release, and a $250,000 fine.

According to the affidavit, Willis and several of his co-defendants frequented Chen’s brothels and Luong’s gambling den. Employees of Luong’s gambling business frequented Chen’s brothels. Some of Luong’s employees, including Joe, associated with Willis.

U.S. Attorney Ortiz; FBI SAC DesLauriers; William P. Offord; Special Agent in Charge of Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation, Boston Field Division; Bruce Foucart, Special Agent in Charge of Immigration and Custom Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations in Boston; and Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis made the announcement today.

The cases were investigated by the FBI, IRS Criminal Investigation, DEA, ICE Homeland Security Investigations, Massachusetts State Police, Massachusetts Department of Correction, and Quincy, Cambridge, Medford, Boston and New York City Police Departments. Assistance was also received from the Broward County (Fla..) Sheriff’s Office and the Ridgeland and Dillon Police Departments in South Carolina. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Timothy E. Moran and Richard L. Hoffman of Ortiz’s Strike Force Unit.

The details contained in the indictments are allegations. The defendants are presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Dandrae L. Jones, Edward W. Jefferson, and Miguel Villa Convicted at a Federal Criminal Trial by a Federal Jury Relating to a Multi-Million Dollar Drug-Trafficking Conspiracy

July 7, 2011

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) on July 6, 2011 released the following:

“Jury Convicts Three Defendants of Charges Related to Multi-Million Dollar Drug-Trafficking Conspiracy
Mexican Drug Cartels Smuggled Hundreds of Kilograms of Cocaine to Kansas City

JUL 06 — KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Beth Phillips, United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri announced that two Kansas City, Missouri men and a St. Paul, Minnesota man were convicted by a federal jury for their roles in one of the largest cocaine trafficking rings in the Kansas City area.

Operation Blockbuster dismantled a local drug-trafficking organization that smuggled hundreds of kilograms of cocaine worth millions of dollars from Mexico to distribute in the Kansas City metropolitan area. Operation Blockbuster was a multi-agency investigation that also involved the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Kansas, resulting in three separate indictments charging 31 defendants.

Dandrae L. Jones, also known as “Bird,” 35, and Edward W. Jefferson, 39, also known as “Black Walt,” both of Kansas City, were found guilty on Thursday, June 20, 2011, of a drug conspiracy to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine from Jan. 1, 2007, to Feb. 11, 2010, which was charged in a Feb. 11, 2010, federal indictment. Jefferson was also found guilty of using a telephone to facilitate the distribution of cocaine. Miguel Villa, 31, of St. Paul, was found guilty of bulk cash smuggling for attempting to transport $300,000 in hidden compartments of a Ford F-150 truck.

Co-defendants Marlon Jordan, 29, and Michael D. Davis, 26, both of Kansas City, MO, pleaded guilty earlier this month to their roles in the drug-trafficking conspiracy.

In two separate but related cases, five defendants have been convicted at trial and 15 pleaded guilty.

Evidence introduced during the trial indicated that the leader of the conspiracy, Alejandro S. Corredor, also known as “Lou Lou,” “Rolo,” and “Alex,” 36, a citizen of Colombia residing in Kansas City, MO, had connections with a Mexican drug cartel. Corredor is among the defendants who pleaded guilty in a separate but related case.

Corredor called his supplier in Mexico to order cocaine to be delivered to the Kansas City metropolitan area. A normal load of cocaine would be from 20 to 50 kilograms, which was smuggled in vehicles driven to Kansas City from Mexico. After Corredor sold the cocaine and collected the money, he packaged the cash in bundles that were hidden in false compartments of various vehicles. The vehicles would then deliver the money to the El Paso, Texas area, where it would be transported across the border into Mexico.

Jones, a local rap artist and owner of Block Life Entertainment, was one of Corredor’s biggest distributors in the Kansas City area. Corredor invested from $200,000 to 250,000 in Block Life Entertainment, and allowed Jones to live rent-free in one of his residential properties.

Jefferson was also a rap artist and one of Corredor’s distributors. Villa was a courier who transported $300,000 in drug-trafficking proceeds from Kansas City to Mexico in hidden compartments of his Ford F-150 truck.

During Operation Blockbuster, law enforcement officers seized large quantities of cocaine and marijuana and millions of dollars in drug proceeds. For example, while executing a search warrant at a Kansas City, Missouri residence, officers seized 46 kilogram-bundles of cocaine, $151,000, and a drug ledger. The ledger showed that during a four-month period, this drug-trafficking organization distributed more than 800 kilograms of cocaine and received $10 million in drug proceeds.

Law enforcement officers also seized more than $1.6 million that was hidden in two vehicles on March 9, 2009. Agents were conducting surveillance at a Kansas City residence that day when they observed conspirators hiding what they learned were bundles of cash inside the door panels of a Jeep Cherokee. The Jeep was stopped by a trooper with the Missouri State Highway Patrol while traveling through Cass County, MO. During a search of the Jeep and a Nissan that was being towed, the trooper recovered 163 bundles of cash. Among several other cash seizures, officers seized nearly $654,000 in a traffic stop on May 9, 2009, and more than $50,000 from another vehicle on May19, 2009, all of which was proceeds from the drug-trafficking conspiracy.

Following the presentation of evidence, the jury in the U.S. District Court in Kansas City deliberated for close to eight hours before returning the guilty verdicts to U.S. District Judge Nanette K. Laughrey, ending a trial that began Monday, June 27, 2011.

Under federal statutes, Jones and Jefferson are each subject to a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in federal prison without parole, up to life in federal prison without parole. Villa is subject to up to five to years of imprisonment for bulk cash smuggling. Sentencing hearings will be scheduled after the completion of presentence investigations by the United States Probation Office.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Joseph M. Marquez and Patrick D. Daly. It was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Homeland Security Investigations, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, IRS-Criminal Investigation and the Kansas City, Mo., Police Department.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Seven Indicted in Virginia for Alleged Drug Trafficking Conspiracy

September 27, 2010

Seven men were charged in a 34-count indictment last Thursday for trafficking cocaine and firearms in Prince William County.

Neil H. MacBride, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia; Shawn Henry, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office; Edgar A. Domenech, Special Agent in Charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives’ (ATF) Washington Field Division; and Charlie T. Deane, Prince William County Chief of Police, made the announcement after the indictment was unsealed.

According to court records, Yasin Oriza Arreola, a/k/a Tony or El Diablo, 30, of Catlett, Va., is accused of being a significant source for distributing cocaine in Prince William County and is allegedly supplied by a Mexican drug trafficking organization. Court records allege that he has posed as a construction worker—including driving a white work van and wearing a reflective construction vest—to conduct drug transactions at various spots throughout the county. He and others in the conspiracy are alleged to have possessed firearms during drug negotiations and also agreed to sell firearms—including a machine gun—to drug customers.

In addition, the following six men were also charged in the indictment as conspiring with Arreola in running this cocaine trafficking ring:

Jose Salgado Lovo, 40, of Manassas, Va.; Isitro Liberato, a/k/a Joker, 20, of Manassas, Va.; Kelvin Martinez, a/k/a Solo, 25, of Manassas, Va.; Manuel Perez Castillo, a/k/a New York, 42, of Manassas, Va.; Jorge Isiais Fernandez, a/k/a Esquivel Madrazo Aquiles, Chesperito, or Picapiedra, 35, of Manassas, Va.; Angel Enrique Flores, a/k/a Don Angel, 44, of Manassas, Va.

In a conspiracy, each individual may be held accountable for every act that occurred in furtherance of the conspiracy, even if committed by others in the alleged conspiracy. If the government can prove that an individual has the requisite knowledge of the existence of the conspiracy, the individual will be held liable for every act committed. Unfortunately, this will result in a much longer sentence for the individual if convicted.

The defendants were previously charged by criminal complaint and arrested on August 25, 2010. They face mandatory minimum penalties ranging from 10 years in prison to 40 years in prison and a maximum penalty of life in prison.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, Interpol Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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