Houston Independent School District Police Officer Charged with Alleged Extortion

October 18, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on October 17, 2012 released the following:

“HOUSTON— Richard Cano, 46, of Katy, has been arrested and charged with extortion under color of official right, United States Attorney Kenneth Magison announced today.

The criminal complaint alleges Cano, a Houston Independent School District (HISD) Police officer, was involved in a towing scheme using his authority as a peace officer. Cano allegedly stopped individuals on public streets and would then have the vehicle towed without further law enforcement action. According to the complaint, Cano would then meet with the tow truck driver and split the towing fee.

Cano was arrested yesterday and made his initial appearance before U.S. District Judge Mary Milloy just a short time ago, at which time he was order released upon posting $50,000 bond.

If convicted, Cano faces up to 20 years in federal prison, as well as a possible $250,000 fine.

The investigation was conducted by the FBI, Houston Police Department-Internal Affairs, the Texas Rangers, with the assistance of HISD and other agencies. Assistant United States Attorney James McAlister is prosecuting the case.”

US v. Richard Cano – Criminal Complaint

18 U.S.C. § 1951

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Kim Davis Indicted by a Federal Grand Jury Allegeding Conspiring to Commit Extortion Under Color of Official Right, Extortion Under Color of Official Right, and Corrupt Solicitation or Acceptance of a Bribe

February 1, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on January 31, 2012 released the following:

“East Orange Construction Official Charged with Taking Bribe

NEWARK, NJ—A longtime construction official in the property maintenance department of the city of East Orange, N.J., was arrested this morning in East Orange by special agents of the FBI for allegedly taking a bribe from an East Orange property owner in exchange for his assistance in city government matters, U.S. Attorney Fishman announced.

Kim Davis, 45, of New York and formerly of Newark, is charged by indictment with one count of conspiring to commit extortion under color of official right; one count of extortion under color of official right—for accepting a $5,000 corrupt cash payment in exchange for official action; and one count of corrupt solicitation or acceptance of a bribe. Davis is expected to appear this afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Cathy L. Waldor in Newark federal court.

According to the indictment unsealed today:

Davis is a certified technical assistant to construction officials in the building division of the property maintenance department of the city of East Orange. The building division is responsible for the enforcement of the New Jersey Uniform Construction Code and the approval of all applications for construction, alterations and renovations of buildings within the city.

Davis and an inspector in the code and enforcement division of the property maintenance department—referred to in the indictment as co-conspirator 1—conspired in 2007 to accept corrupt cash payments from East Orange property owners and developers in exchange for promises of official action in East Orange government matters related to the construction and development of property. Specifically, Davis accepted a $5,000 bribe from an East Orange property owner in September 2007.

The extortion and conspiracy counts each carry a maximum potential penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, or twice the aggregate loss to victims or gain to the defendant. The bribery count carries a maximum potential penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, or twice the aggregate loss to victims or gain to the defendant.

U.S. Attorney Fishman credited special agents of the FBI’s Garret Mountain Resident Agency, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Michael B. Ward, for the investigation leading to the indictment.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Sandra L. Moser of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Special Prosecutions Division in Newark.

The charges and allegations contained in the indictment are merely accusations, and the defendant is considered innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


John F. Williams, an Elected Member of Warner Robins City Council, Indicted by a Federal Grand Jury

October 19, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on October 18, 2011 released the following:

“Michael J. Moore, United States Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, announced that John F. Williams, an elected member of Warner Robins City Council, has been indicted by a federal grand jury and was today arrested for extortion under color of official right, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1951(a); false statements to a federal agency, in violation of Title 18 United States Code, Section 1001; and tampering with a witness, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1512(b)(3).

Count one of the indictment alleges that John F. Williams did knowingly and intentionally attempt to obstruct and affect, in any way and degree, commerce and the movement of articles and commodities in commerce by extortion; that is Williams unlawfully obtained property from another person in the form of $1,720.00 not otherwise due him and as a commission in relation to the sale of a vehicle to the Warner Robins Police Department. The maximum penalty for count one is 20 years’ imprisonment; a $250,000.00 fine; three years’ supervised release; and a $100 mandatory assessment fee.

Count two of the indictment alleges that John F. Williams did knowingly and willfully make a materially false statement to the Federal Bureau of Investigation concerning the sale of the vehicle to the Warner Robins Police Department, stating that he received no payment of money in relation to the sale of the vehicle, when in truth and fact Williams received a payment of $1,720.00 in relation to the sale. The maximum penalty for count two is five years’ imprisonment; a $250,000.00 fine; three years’ supervised release; and a $100 mandatory assessment fee.

Count three of the indictment alleges that John F. Williams attempted to corruptly persuade another person with intent to hinder, delay, and prevent the communication to a law enforcement officer regarding the sale of the vehicle. The maximum penalty for count three is 20 years’ imprisonment; a $250,000.00 fine; three years’ supervised release; and a $100 mandatory assessment fee.

“My office is committed to fighting criminal activity wherever it is found, whether that be on the city streets or in the city hall,” said U.S. Attorney Michael Moore.

Criminal indictments are only charges and not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Eduardo Garcia Indicted by a Laredo Federal Grand Jury for Extortion Under Color of Official Right and Unauthorized Access to Protected Computer Information

August 10, 2011

The U.S. Attorney’s Office Southern District of Texas on August 9, 2011 released the following:

“Webb County Deputy Constable Indicted for Accepting Bribes

LAREDO, Texas – A Webb County Deputy Constable has been arrested following the return of an indictment by a Laredo grand jury accusing him of accepting bribes in his official capacity and accessing protected computer information, United States Attorney José Angel Moreno announced today along with FBI Special Agent in Charge Cory B. Nelson and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) acting Special Agent in Charge Thomas E. Hinojosa.

A four-count indictment was returned under seal on Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2011, charging Deputy Constable Eduardo Garcia, 44, of Laredo, with three counts of extortion under color of official right, that is, accepting bribes from another purported engaged in criminal conduct including illegal narcotics trafficking in exchange for the performing or not performing an official act. The fourth count of the indictment accuses Garcia of unauthorized access to protected computer information.

Garcia was arrested by FBI agents late yesterday afternoon. He made his initial appearance this morning before U.S. Magistrate Judge Guillermo Garcia at which time the indictment was officially unsealed and Garcia was ordered temporarily detained pending a detention hearing set for Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. before U.S. Magistrate Judge J. Scott Hacker.

According to allegations in the indictment, Garcia has been a peace officer since 1993. During all times relevant to the indictment, he was employed as a deputy constable involved in operating a prison transport van among other duties. In or about Oct. 22, 2008, Garcia is accused of accepting a $500 bribe to provide protection for a vehicle which he believed to be transporting in excess of 500 grams of cocaine from south Laredo to north Laredo. He is also accused of accepting another $500 bribe on Nov. 21, 2008, to escort a second vehicle he believed to be transporting cocaine. Garcia is accused in the third count of the indictment of accepting a $200 bribe to cause another to check a license plate number for a specific license plate through the Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (TLETs), a protected computer system in March 2011. Lastly, Garcia is accused of a violating the computer fraud and abuse act by causing another person to exceed authorized access by performing a license plate check and obtaining information from a protected computer.

Each of the three Hobbs Act violations carries a statutory maximum penalty upon conviction of 20 years in prison without parole and a $250,000 fine. The alleged computer abuse and fraud act violation carries a maximum five-year-term of imprisonment and a $250,000 fine upon conviction.

The investigation resulting in the charges against Garcia was conducted by the Laredo offices of the FBI and the DEA. Assistant United States Attorneys Roberto F. Ramirez and Elizabeth R. Rabe are prosecuting the case.

An indictment is a formal accusation of criminal conduct, not evidence.
A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until convicted through due process of law.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Houston Police Officer Leslie Aikens Indicted by a Houston Federal Grand Jury for Alleged Drug Trafficking and Corruption

July 27, 2011
Sgt. Leslie Aikens
HPD Sgt. Leslie Aikens

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on July 27, 2011 released the following:

“Sealed Indictment Charging an HPD Officer Unsealed Following His Arrest

HOUSTON—A Houston Police officer has been arrested following the return of an indictment by a Houston grand jury charging him with drug trafficking and corruption, United States Attorney José Angel Moreno announced today along with FBI Special Agent in Charge Stephen L. Morris.

A two-count indictment was returned under seal on Wednesday, June 22, 2011, charging Houston police officer Leslie Aikens, 46, of Houston, a 19-year veteran of the Houston Police Department (HPD). The indictment was unsealed today following Aiken’s arrest by officers with Houston Police Department Internal Affairs, Texas Rangers, and agents of the FBI as he went off-duty at the HPD substation where he is assigned. Aikens appeared late this morning before U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Milloy and has been ordered released on a $50,000 bond.

Aikens is charged with aiding and abetting the possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine on or about March 10, 2011. He is also charged with extortion under color of official right or a Hobbs Act violation for allegedly accepting a $2,000 bribe to provide protection for a vehicle which he believe to be transporting seven kilograms of cocaine.

The drug offense charged in count one of the indictment carries a statutory penalty of not less than 10 years or more than life imprisonment and a $10 million fine upon conviction. The Hobb’s Act violation as alleged in the second count of the indictment count carries a statutory penalty upon conviction of 20 years’ incarceration without parole and a $250,000 fine.

The investigative effort resulting in the charges was conducted by the Houston office of the FBI, Texas Rangers, and HPD.

Assistant U.S. Attorney James McAlister is prosecuting the case.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Anthony V. Foster Indicted by a Federal Grand Jury with Public Corruption Charges

July 6, 2011

The U.S. Attorney’s Office Middle District of Florida on July 5, 2011 released the following:

“ST. PETERSBURG POLICE DEPARTMENT DETECTIVE INDICTED

Tampa, Florida – United States Attorney Robert E. O’Neill announces the return of a seven-count indictment by a grand jury charging Anthony V. Foster (39, St. Petersburg) with public corruption charges. Counts one through six charge Foster with a wire fraud scheme to deprive the public of honest services. Count seven charges Foster with attempted extortion under color of official right. If convicted, Foster faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in federal prison, per count. The indictment also notifies Foster that the United States intends to forfeit $7,400 and a Samsung Television, which are alleged to be traceable to proceeds of the offense.

Foster was first arrested pursuant to a federal complaint on June 8, 2011. According to the charging documents, Foster, who worked as a detective for the St. Petersburg Police Department (“SPPD”), told one of his sources that he would contact state authorities involved in the source’s state criminal cases to provide positive information about the source in exchange for Foster’s personal receipt of cash and property payments. Sometime thereafter, Foster and the source met so that Foster could secure cash and property payments from the source. According to the indictment, Foster sent and received text messages to coordinate the meetings with the source.

The indictment also alleges that Foster contacted state authorities involved with the source’s state criminal cases, identified himself as a detective with the SPPD, and provided positive information about the source’s involvement in various SPPD investigations. The indictment further alleges that Foster caused other SPPD officials to also contact state authorities on behalf of the source.

An indictment is merely a formal charge that a defendant has committed a violation of the federal criminal laws, and every defendant is presumed innocent unless, and until, proven guilty.

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. It will be prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Jay G. Trezevant.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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