“Dominican national arrested at Houston airport for allegedly importing cocaine by ingesting pellets”

May 15, 2013

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on May 14, 2013 released the following:

“HOUSTON — A citizen of the Dominican Republic was arrested at the airport Saturday for allegedly importing cocaine by ingesting 53 pellets of the drug, announced U.S. Attorney Kenneth Magidson, Southern District of Texas.

The investigation leading to these charges was conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Mikkail Antonio Nolasco Jimenez, 27, was arrested at Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH) after it was determined he had allegedly ingested 53 pellets containing cocaine.

The criminal complaint filed Tuesday alleges that on May 11 Jimenez arrived aboard a flight from Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago bound for New York. HSI special agents became suspicious when Jimenez provided inconsistent statements. Upon further investigation, they discovered anomalies in his body resembling pellets believed to contain a controlled substance. Jimenez was then transported and admitted to an area hospital.

Jimenez allegedly expelled a total of 53 pellets, containing a substance that field tested positive for cocaine, according to the complaint.

Jimenez made his initial appearance May 14 before U.S Magistrate Judge Stephen William Smith, at which time he was ordered into custody pending a May 16 detention hearing.

Upon conviction, Jimenez faces a mandatory minimum of five and up to 40 years in prison each for importing cocaine, and conspiracy to import cocaine.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Stuart A. Burns, Southern District of Texas, is prosecuting the case.

A criminal complaint is a formal accusation of criminal conduct, not evidence. A defendant is presumed innocent unless convicted through due process of law.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Sixteen Individuals in Colletion and Dorchester Counties Federally Indicted as Part of an Alleged Federal Drug Conspiracy

March 27, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on March 27, 2012 released the following:

“COLUMBIA, SC— United States Attorney Bill Nettles stated that Ivory Brothers, Kyedrick Edwards, Jonathan Edwards, Joey Maurice Charles, Tiffany Elliot, Paul Steve Braxton, Edward Bryant, Bryant Davis, Rocky Creel, Elijah Deal, Gerwron Lingard, Jerry Rivers, Charles Youmans, Martin Louis Ballard, Norman Robinson, and Yvette Renee Calvin, of Colleton and Dorchester Counties in South Carolina, were charged in a five-count indictment with conspiring to possess with intent to distribute and distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine and 280 grams or more of cocaine base (commonly known as “crack”), a violation of Title 21, United States Code, Section 846, as well as possessing with intent to distribute and distributing crack cocaine, violations of Title 21, United States Code, Section 841. If convicted, these defendants face a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 10 years, a maximum term of imprisonment of life, and a $4 million fine.

The case was the result of a year-long investigation involving agents of the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force, which consists of members from the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Federal Bureau of Investigations, the Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office, Charleston County Sheriff’s Office, Charleston Police Department, the Dorchester County Sheriff’s Office, the North Charleston Police Department, the South Carolina Highway Patrol, and the Summerville Police Department. Also involved in the investigation were members of the Walterboro Department of Public Safety. This case is assigned to Assistant United States Attorney Peter Phillips of the Charleston office for prosecution.

The United States Attorney stated that all charges in this indictment are merely accusations and that all defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.”

21 U.S.C. § 841

21 U.S.C. § 846

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Jury Convicts Four Hermanos Pistoleros Latinos Gang Members of Drug and Firearms Charges

June 29, 2011

U.S. Attorney’s Office Southern District of Texas on June 28, 2011 released the following press release:

“LAREDO, Texas – Late yesterday afternoon a federal jury convicted four members of the Hermanos Pistoleros Latinos (HPL) street gang of various charges arising from a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) sting operation, United States Attorney José Angel Moreno announced today.

Mark Anthony Milan, 26, Cristobal Cervantes, 28, and Luis Eduardo Alvarez, 27, all of Laredo, were found guilty of conspiracy with intent to distribute 25 kilograms of cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. A fourth defendant, Michael Porras-Castillo, 25, also of Laredo, along with Milan and Cervantes, were found guilty of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. All four defendants have been remanded into the custody of the United States Marshals Service pending their sentencing on Oct. 11, 2011. All four defendants are self-professed members of the HPL.

During trial before U.S. District Judge Micaela Alvarez, the jury heard testimony from ATF agents that Milan came to the attention of the ATF last year when Milan attempted to buy 25 machine guns he intended to sell in Mexico from an undercover ATF agent. That deal was called off by the ATF agent when the money was not timely produced.

However, ATF initiated a separate investigation into Milan after learning that Milan had expressed an interest in committing home invasions to a confidential source. In February 2011, Milan met with a second undercover ATF agent (UC) on three separate occasions. Each time Milan was accompanied by Cervantes. During each meeting, the UC, who posed as a disgruntled truck driver, Milan and Cervantes discussed burglarizing a residence purportedly containing 25 kilograms of cocaine. The UC was to receive five kilograms of the contraband for the information. It was agreed that the burglary would take place on March 9, 2011, and a final meeting between the UC and the defendants was set to occur on that date in advance of the operation.

On March 9, 2011, at their final meeting before executing the planned home invasion, Milan and Cervantes were accompanied by co-defendants Porras-Castillo and Alvarez. All four of the defendants were dressed all in black, with Russain SKS assault weapons, body armor, gloves, handcuffs and ski masks. The UC spoke with the four defendants briefly as they sat in their vehicle and briefly reviewed the planned invasion and drugs to be taken. As planned, before the “home invasion” could occur, other ATF agents observing the planned meeting, moved in and arrested all four defendants.

During trial, Milan and Cervantes attempted to convince the jury they had been entrapped by the UC, that is, they claimed they would not have been involved in the conspiracy had the UC not suggested it. Their attempt proved unveiling as the jury found them both guilty of conspiring to possess with intent to distribute the 25 kilograms of purported cocaine. Porras and Alvarez claimed they had been recruited to commit a home invasion to collect money which was owed and denied any knowledge of cocaine. The claim proved unavailing for Alvarez who was convicted of the drug conspiracy charge. Porras, who claimed a limited understanding of the English language, was acquitted of the drug conspiracy, but found guilty along with Milan and Cervantes of being a felon in possession of a firearm. Convicted felons are prohibited by law from possessing firearms or ammunition.

Assistant United States Attorney James Ustynoski represented the United States at trial and is prosecuting the case.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Seven in Texas Charged with Alleged Federal Drug Conspiracy Crimes

March 3, 2011

A sealed indictment charging seven Brownsville-area residents with alleged federal crimes, conspiring to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and/or laundering the drug proceeds, was unsealed on Wednesday following the arrest of the individuals. The arrests were announced by U.S. Attorney José Angel Moreno, Southern District of Texas.

The seven individuals were arrested March 2 in Corpus Christi.The investigation led to the criminal charges of the following individuals: Arturo Gomez, 31; Magda Zendejas, 28; Reyna Ceballos, 21; Julio Gonzalez, 45; David Alcala, 30; Vanessa Weaver, 28; and Sonia Garcia-Medina, 26. All seven are expected to appear before U.S. Magistrate Judge Felix Recio in Brownsville, March 3.

The four-count indictment returned on Febuary 23, by a Corpus Christi grand jury and now unsealed, charges five of the six individuals – Gomez, Zendejas, Ceballos, Gonzalez and Alcala – with allegedly conspiring for a two-year period beginning in January 2009 to possess with intent to distribute kilogram quantities of cocaine. Based upon the amount of the alleged cocaine involved, the individuals face no less than 10 years, and a maximum of life imprisonment if convicted.

Gomez is also charged individually with alleged conspiracy to launder monetary instruments which carries a maximum 20-year prison term upon conviction. Gomez is charged in a separate count with allegedly smuggling $47,205 in bulk cash. Weaver is also charged in a separate count with allegedly smuggling $16,530 in bulk cash. A conviction for bulk-cash smuggling carries a maximum five-year-term of imprisonment upon conviction. Included in the indictment is a notice of the government’s intent to seek a money judgment in the amount of $1 million against Gomez, alleging the sum constitutes the total from laundered drug proceeds and therefore forfeitable to the United States.

The seventh individual, Garcia-Medina, is charged separately by criminal complaint with being an alien illegally present in the U.S. after having been previously deported. Garcia-Medina faces up to 20 years imprisonment if convicted.

The individuals arrested yesterday do not appear to be leaders of a drug organization. However, the government frequently seeks those involved in lower-level narcotics operations as a means of gathering information regarding others, specifically higher-ups in the chain of command. To induce cooperation, the government typically uses plea agreements and reduced sentences to obtain substantial assistance from individuals facing serious drug charges.

To view the press release issued by ICE, please click here.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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