Chicago Investment Advisor Accused of Defrauding Suburban Bank and Two Clients of More Than $3.2 Million

May 31, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation on May 31, 2012 released the following:

“CHICAGO— A Chicago investment advisor was indicted on federal charges for allegedly engaging in a scheme to defraud Oak Brook-based Leaders Bank and two of his clients of more than $3.2 million and ultimately causing the bank to lose more than $2.7 million. The defendant, Robert J. Lunn, was charged with five counts of bank fraud in an indictment returned by a federal grand jury yesterday, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, and Robert D. Grant, Special Agent in Charge of the Chicago Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, announced today.

Lunn, 62, of Chicago, who did business as Lunn Partners LLC, an investment advisory business, will be arraigned at a later date in U.S. District Court.

According to the indictment, Lunn fraudulently obtained a $1.32 million line of credit from the bank for his business, as well as separate loans of $1.4 million and $500,000, purportedly on behalf of two clients. Lunn allegedly made a series of misrepresentations to Leaders Bank about his own assets, the purpose of the loans, and the knowing authorization of clients purportedly seeking the financing. Instead, Lunn used substantially all of the fraudulently obtained funds for his own benefit, including to make mortgage payments and approximately $1.4 million in payments to other investment clients, the charges allege.

Lunn initially obtained a business line of credit from Leaders Bank for $480,000 in May 2001. He increased the credit line twice in early 2004, first to $1.2 million and later to $1.32 million, all after he allegedly submitted personal financial statements to the bank falsely stating that he owned millions of dollars of stock in Morgan Stanley and Lehman Brothers. In September 2002, Lunn arranged for an unsecured bank loan of $1.4 million, purportedly for the benefit of Client A, after submitting a net worth report for Client A and asserting that Client A wanted short-term financing to purchase an interest in an airplane, according to the indictment. In June 2004, Lunn allegedly arranged a bank loan for $500,000 for the benefit of Client B, without Client B’s knowledge or authorization, after submitting a net worth report for Client B and stating that Client B wanted short-term financing for a business investment.

The indictment seeks forfeiture of at least $2.7 million in alleged fraud proceeds.

The government is being represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Daniel Collins.

Each count of bank fraud carries a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine, and restitution is mandatory. The court may also impose a fine totaling twice the loss to any victim or twice the gain to the defendant, whichever is greater. If convicted, the court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

An indictment contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


6 suspects in black market pot-sale bust facing prison

May 4, 2012

Chicago Tribune on May 3, 2012 released the following:

“Chris Conrad
Mail Tribune, Medford, Ore.

Federal prosecutors say the six men accused of funneling thousands of pounds of excess buds grown on medical marijuana farms to the black market could face a mandatory five years in prison if they are convicted.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Doug Fong said federal statutes allow for mandatory prison sentences for marijuana offenses if more than 100 plants are involved. However, prosecutors could forgo the mandatory sentences, depending on the suspects’ criminal history and whether they cooperate with the investigation. “The absolute maximum penalty would be 40 years in prison and a $5 million fine,” Fong said.

Fong said four named in the federal indictment released Tuesday have made their initial appearance in U.S. District Court in Medford.

Brian Wayne Simmons, Clifford Ruhland, Caleb Joseph Kulp and Scott Grantski appeared in court on charges of manufacture, delivery and possession of marijuana, Fong said.

Michael Reed Peru and John Wayne Johnson could be arraigned in the near future, Fong said.

“They are not being held in jail at this time,” Fong said. The men have deep ties to the Rogue Valley and are not believed to be a flight risk prior to their trial, Fong said.

The men are believed to have grown at least 4,000 pounds of excess marijuana at medical gardens in Medford and Central Point last year, according to a federal affidavit.

The buds from these plants were in the process of drying when Drug Enforcement Administration agents raided the farms on Dark Hollow, East Gregory and Table Rock roads in October, the affidavit says.

Fong said the scope of the investigation was responsible for the nearly seven-month lag time between the raids and the indictment.

DEA investigators culled through bank records and video surveillance linked to the group as they tried to piece the case together. “It takes time to look through all this evidence and try to understand what you’re seeing,” Fong said.

Investigators believe Peru was a major player in the crimes, which include moving pounds of Southern Oregon marijuana up Interstate 5 for sale in Washington.

Peru made local headlines about eight years ago when he tried to build a golf course on private and environmentally sensitive public land at the site of the Billings Ranch in north Ashland.

When reached by phone Wednesday, Peru declined to comment on the claims made by the DEA in the indictment.

“All I can say is that I didn’t do half of what they accused me of,” Peru said. “I’m going to wait and see what happens before I make a statement.”

Peru’s son, identified as Reed Peru in the indictment, was arrested by Washington police after allegedly selling 12 pounds of marijuana to a police informant in Bremerton, near Seattle.

Prosecutors believe Mike Peru was selling buds grown in Jackson County in Washington.

Bank account records noted in the indictment showed that Mike Peru, Simmons and Ruhland deposited upwards of $40,000 in cash at a time between October 2010 and October 2011. Prosecutors believe the proceeds are from black-market marijuana.

Attempts to reach the five other men named in the indictment were not successful Wednesday.

Peru did say that Ruhland was the boyfriend of Kaelin Glazier at the time the Ruch teen was killed in 1996.

“He told me once that he never really got over that,” Peru said.

Ruhland has a previous felony marijuana conviction, according to Jackson County Circuit Court records.

Fong said the plants pulled from the suspects’ farms were “impressive” in their size and the amount of high-quality buds they produced.

“Some of these plants produced more than 10 pounds of bud,” Fong said.

Oregon Medical Marijuana Program guidelines allow a registered grower to produce six mature plants 12 inches or taller per patient, for up to four patients.

There is no limit to the number of growers per site. But all the marijuana produced must belong to the patients, who can possess only 1.5 pounds of usable buds at one time.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Bryan Day Charged by a Federal Grand Jury in an Indictment Alleging a $1 Million Medicare Fraud Scheme

May 2, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on May 2, 2012 released the following:

“Chicago-Area Man Charged in $1 Million Medicare Fraud Scheme

CHICAGO— A south suburban resident who purported to provide psychotherapy services to Medicare patients was charged with participating in a $1 million health care fraud scheme, the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services announced today.

The defendant, Bryan Day, 42, of Richton Park, who is not a licensed medical professional, operated and was part owner of Charm Development LLC, located in Chicago Heights, which purported to provide psychotherapy services to patients, primarily in nursing homes and long-term care facilities. Day was charged with six counts of health care fraud in an indictment returned by a federal grand jury last week and announced today by Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; Lamont Pugh III, Special Agent in Charge of the Chicago Regional Office of the HHS-OIG; and Robert D. Grant, Special Agent in Charge of the Chicago Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Day is scheduled to be arraigned at 1:30 p.m. May 14 before U.S. District Judge Virginia Kendall in federal court in Chicago.

The indictment alleges that between January 2008 and June 2009 Day submitted fraudulent claims to Medicare totaling $1,078,733, and caused Medicare to pay approximately $438,852. Day allegedly submitted claims for individual psychotherapy services purportedly performed by Doctor A, knowing that Doctor A did not provide the services claimed. In addition, the claims included services that were purportedly provided at times when Doctor A was not present at Charm and not licensed by the state of Illinois. The claims also included services that were purportedly provided by Doctor A after Doctor A was no longer employed by Charm, and Day allegedly submitted Medicare claims for services purportedly rendered by Doctor A in excess of 24 hours a day.

According to the indictment, Doctor A was licensed to practice medicine in Illinois until July 31, 2008, and Doctor A was employed by Charm from May 2005 until February 2009.

The indictment seeks forfeiture of approximately $438,852. The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael J. Chmelar. Each count of health care fraud carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, or an alternate fine totaling twice the loss or twice the gain, whichever is greater. If convicted, the court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

An indictment contains merely charges and is not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

The case is part of a nationwide takedown by Medicare Fraud Strike Force operations in seven cities that led to charges against 107 individuals for their alleged participation in schemes to collectively submit approximately $452 million in fraudulent claims to Medicare. This takedown involved the highest amount of false Medicare billings in a single takedown in Strike Force history.

“The results we are announcing today are at the heart of an Administration-wide commitment to protecting American taxpayers from health care fraud, which can drive up costs and threaten the strength and integrity of our health care system,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “We are determined to bring to justice those who violate our laws and defraud the Medicare program for personal gain. As today’s takedown reflects, our ongoing fight against health care fraud has never been more coordinated and effective.”

The Medicare Fraud Strike Force operations, which expanded to Chicago in February 2011, are part of the Health Care Fraud Prevention & Enforcement Action Team (HEAT), a joint initiative announced in May 2009 between the Department of Justice and HHS to focus their efforts to prevent and deter fraud and enforce current anti-fraud laws around the country. Approximately three dozen defendants have been charged in health care fraud cases since the strike force began operating in Chicago last year.

Since their inception in March 2007, Strike Force operations in nine locations have charged more than 1,330 defendants who collectively have falsely billed the Medicare program for more than $4 billion. In addition, the HHS Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in conjunction with the HHS-OIG, are taking steps to increase accountability and decrease the presence of fraudulent providers.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Federal Indictment Charges Former Dixon Comptroller Rita Crundwell with Allegedly Engaging in $53 Million Fraud Since 1990

May 2, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on May 1, 2012 released the following:

U.S. Files Lawsuit Seeking Civil Forfeiture of 311 Quarter Horses in Addition to Seeking Criminal Forfeiture of Seized Assets

ROCKFORD—The former comptroller of the city of Dixon, Illinois, Rita A. Crundwell, was indicted today for allegedly fraudulently obtaining more than $53 million from the town since 1990 and using the proceeds to finance her horse breeding business and lavish lifestyle. A federal grand jury returned a single-count indictment charging Crundwell with one count of wire fraud, announced Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, and Robert D. Grant, Special Agent in Charge of the Chicago office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Since Crundwell was arrested on April 17 and accused of misappropriating more than $30 million since 2006, further investigation resulted in the indictment’s expanded allegation that the fraud exceeded $53 million and spanned more than two decades.

Crundwell, 59, of Dixon, who served as comptroller since 1983 and handled all of the city’s finances, was released on her own recognizance on April 18. She will be arraigned at 10:30 a.m. on May 7 before U.S. Magistrate Judge P. Michael Mahoney in U.S. District Court in Rockford.

The indictment seeks criminal forfeiture of $53 million as well as numerous assets that were seized from Crundwell when she was arrested. On a parallel track, the United States today filed a civil lawsuit alleging that 311 quarter horses owned by Crundwell are subject to civil forfeiture because she purchased and/or maintained them with criminal fraud proceeds. The government will seek eventually to sell the horses and apply the proceeds toward restitution to the city of Dixon.

“The government is pursuing both criminal and civil forfeiture proceedings to ensure that every available tool is being used to recover proceeds of the alleged fraud in order to recoup as much money as possible for the city of Dixon, its residents, and taxpayers,” Mr. Fitzgerald said. The investigation is continuing, he added.

Dixon, with a population of approximately 15,733, is located about 100 miles southwest of Chicago.

Crundwell owns RC Quarter Horses, LLC, and keeps her horses at her ranch on Red Brick Road in Dixon and at the Meri-J Ranch in Beloit, Wisconsin, as well as with various trainers across the country. In addition to 311 registered quarter horses, dozens of foals are expected to be born this spring. As part of the civil lawsuit, the government requested a pretrial restraining order that will secure the government’s interest in the horses and allow officials to take necessary steps to ensure the animals’ health and well-being, including veterinary and dietary care, which has been ongoing. The U.S. Marshals Service is expected to hire a contractor to manage the horses.

The indictment seeks criminal forfeiture of two residences and the horse farm in Dixon; a home in Englewood, Florida; a $2.1 million luxury motor home; more than a dozen trucks, trailers, and other motorized farm vehicles; a 2005 Ford Thunderbird convertible; a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette roadster; a pontoon boat; approximately $224,898 in cash from two bank accounts; and other assets allegedly purchased with fraud proceeds. Many of these assets were seized when Crundwell was arrested, and the government today requested a restraining order on the real estate that is allegedly subject to criminal forfeiture.

According to the indictment, on Dec. 18, 1990, Crundwell opened a bank account in the name of the city of Dixon and RSCDA, known as the RSCDA account. Between December 1990 and April 2012, Crundwell used her position as comptroller to transfer funds from the Dixon’s Money Market account to its Capital Development Fund account, as well as to various other city bank accounts. Crundwell allegedly repeatedly transferred city funds into the RSCDA account and used the money to pay for her own personal and private business expenses, including horse farming operations, personal credit card payments, real estate, and vehicles.

As part of the fraud scheme, Crundwell allegedly created fictitious invoices purported to be from the state of Illinois to show the city’s auditors that the funds she was fraudulently depositing into the RSCDA account were being used for a legitimate purpose. To conceal the scheme, Crundwell told the mayor and city council members that the state was late in its payments to the city, when, in fact, she knew that she had fraudulently transferred the funds for her own use, the indictment alleges.

Wire fraud carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison, and a $250,000 fine, or an alternate fine totaling twice the loss or twice the gain, whichever is greater. If convicted, the court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

The government is represented in the criminal case by Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph C. Pedersen, and in the civil case by Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott Paccagnini.

The public is reminded that an indictment is only a charge and is not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to an indictment by a federal grand jury and a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving her guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Houston Man Charged with Sex Trafficking

October 7, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on October 6, 2011 released the following:

“HOUSTON— A federal grand jury has charged 30-year-old Jerald Bland, aka “Moe Betta,” with sex trafficking of two minors and one adult, as well as transporting one adult and one minor for the purposes of prostitution, United States Attorney Kenneth Magidson announced today.

The five-count indictment returned by the grand jury today, alleges that beginning in March 2010 through June 2010, Bland used force, fraud, or coercion to cause two minors and one adult female to engage in commercial sex acts. Bland is also accused of transporting one minor and one adult female from Texas to Louisiana to engage in prostitution in violation of federal statutes.

The United States has sought a court order to transfer Bland from state custody into federal custody to face the charges and appear for arraignment on a date to be set by the court.

Each of the three counts accusing Bland of sex trafficking carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment and a fine of up to $250,000 upon conviction. Depending on whether a jury were to find that the victims were minors or that he used force, fraud, or coercion, Bland would face minimum mandatory sentences of 10 to 15 years on the sex trafficking charges. The transportation charge relating to the adult victim carries a maximum sentence of up to 10 years in prison. The transportation of a minor charge carries a minimum penalty of 10 years in prison with a maximum of life in prison. Each of those charges also carries a $250,000 fine. If convicted, upon release from any prison sentence Bland would be subject to at least five years of supervised release in which the court would require the defendant conform to certain requirements based on the nature of the charges. The defendant could be on supervised release for life, and if convicted, the defendant would have to register as a sex offender.

This investigation leading to the federal charges was conducted by the Houston FBI Innocence Lost Task Force in conjunction with Houston Police Department. Assistant U.S. Attorney Sherri L. Zack is prosecuting the case.

An indictment is a formal accusation of criminal conduct, not evidence. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty by due process of law.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Dandrae L. Jones, Edward W. Jefferson, and Miguel Villa Convicted at a Federal Criminal Trial by a Federal Jury Relating to a Multi-Million Dollar Drug-Trafficking Conspiracy

July 7, 2011

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) on July 6, 2011 released the following:

“Jury Convicts Three Defendants of Charges Related to Multi-Million Dollar Drug-Trafficking Conspiracy
Mexican Drug Cartels Smuggled Hundreds of Kilograms of Cocaine to Kansas City

JUL 06 — KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Beth Phillips, United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri announced that two Kansas City, Missouri men and a St. Paul, Minnesota man were convicted by a federal jury for their roles in one of the largest cocaine trafficking rings in the Kansas City area.

Operation Blockbuster dismantled a local drug-trafficking organization that smuggled hundreds of kilograms of cocaine worth millions of dollars from Mexico to distribute in the Kansas City metropolitan area. Operation Blockbuster was a multi-agency investigation that also involved the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Kansas, resulting in three separate indictments charging 31 defendants.

Dandrae L. Jones, also known as “Bird,” 35, and Edward W. Jefferson, 39, also known as “Black Walt,” both of Kansas City, were found guilty on Thursday, June 20, 2011, of a drug conspiracy to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine from Jan. 1, 2007, to Feb. 11, 2010, which was charged in a Feb. 11, 2010, federal indictment. Jefferson was also found guilty of using a telephone to facilitate the distribution of cocaine. Miguel Villa, 31, of St. Paul, was found guilty of bulk cash smuggling for attempting to transport $300,000 in hidden compartments of a Ford F-150 truck.

Co-defendants Marlon Jordan, 29, and Michael D. Davis, 26, both of Kansas City, MO, pleaded guilty earlier this month to their roles in the drug-trafficking conspiracy.

In two separate but related cases, five defendants have been convicted at trial and 15 pleaded guilty.

Evidence introduced during the trial indicated that the leader of the conspiracy, Alejandro S. Corredor, also known as “Lou Lou,” “Rolo,” and “Alex,” 36, a citizen of Colombia residing in Kansas City, MO, had connections with a Mexican drug cartel. Corredor is among the defendants who pleaded guilty in a separate but related case.

Corredor called his supplier in Mexico to order cocaine to be delivered to the Kansas City metropolitan area. A normal load of cocaine would be from 20 to 50 kilograms, which was smuggled in vehicles driven to Kansas City from Mexico. After Corredor sold the cocaine and collected the money, he packaged the cash in bundles that were hidden in false compartments of various vehicles. The vehicles would then deliver the money to the El Paso, Texas area, where it would be transported across the border into Mexico.

Jones, a local rap artist and owner of Block Life Entertainment, was one of Corredor’s biggest distributors in the Kansas City area. Corredor invested from $200,000 to 250,000 in Block Life Entertainment, and allowed Jones to live rent-free in one of his residential properties.

Jefferson was also a rap artist and one of Corredor’s distributors. Villa was a courier who transported $300,000 in drug-trafficking proceeds from Kansas City to Mexico in hidden compartments of his Ford F-150 truck.

During Operation Blockbuster, law enforcement officers seized large quantities of cocaine and marijuana and millions of dollars in drug proceeds. For example, while executing a search warrant at a Kansas City, Missouri residence, officers seized 46 kilogram-bundles of cocaine, $151,000, and a drug ledger. The ledger showed that during a four-month period, this drug-trafficking organization distributed more than 800 kilograms of cocaine and received $10 million in drug proceeds.

Law enforcement officers also seized more than $1.6 million that was hidden in two vehicles on March 9, 2009. Agents were conducting surveillance at a Kansas City residence that day when they observed conspirators hiding what they learned were bundles of cash inside the door panels of a Jeep Cherokee. The Jeep was stopped by a trooper with the Missouri State Highway Patrol while traveling through Cass County, MO. During a search of the Jeep and a Nissan that was being towed, the trooper recovered 163 bundles of cash. Among several other cash seizures, officers seized nearly $654,000 in a traffic stop on May 9, 2009, and more than $50,000 from another vehicle on May19, 2009, all of which was proceeds from the drug-trafficking conspiracy.

Following the presentation of evidence, the jury in the U.S. District Court in Kansas City deliberated for close to eight hours before returning the guilty verdicts to U.S. District Judge Nanette K. Laughrey, ending a trial that began Monday, June 27, 2011.

Under federal statutes, Jones and Jefferson are each subject to a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in federal prison without parole, up to life in federal prison without parole. Villa is subject to up to five to years of imprisonment for bulk cash smuggling. Sentencing hearings will be scheduled after the completion of presentence investigations by the United States Probation Office.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Joseph M. Marquez and Patrick D. Daly. It was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Homeland Security Investigations, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, IRS-Criminal Investigation and the Kansas City, Mo., Police Department.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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