Feds raid NJ capital’s city hall one day after searching mayor’s home

July 19, 2012

CNN on July 19, 2012 released the following:

“Federal agents raided City Hall in New Jersey’s capital on Thursday, one day after they swarmed the home of the city’s mayor, as well as those of his brother and a campaign supporter.

“The FBI is executing search warrants at various offices at Trenton City Hall, pursuant to an ongoing investigation,” FBI Public Affairs Officer Barbara Woodruff said.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Evidence Reveals James “Whitey” Bulger’s Secret Life on the Run

June 18, 2012

NBCLosAngeles.com on June 16, 2012 released the following:

“The feds release 1,000 pages of evidence in the case of one of America’s most wanted mobsters

By Jason Kandel

A neighbor said the old man would sit up all night peering through binoculars from the third floor of The Princess Eugenia, a three-story building three blocks from a Santa Monica bluff that overlooks the Pacific Ocean.

A handwritten sign on the apartment door said “Please Do Not Knock” because he slept during the day.

But nearby residents had no idea that the man was really James “Whitey” Bulger, one of most wanted fugitives in the world.

Hundreds of documents and photos released by federal prosecutors Friday offer a detailed look inside the California apartment where Bulger and his longtime girlfriend, Catherine Greig, hid out during 16 years on the run.

In their Santa Monica apartment, investigators found a weekly planner filled with notes on everyday tasks, including laundry, cleaning, picking up prescriptions and going to doctor’s appointments.

But they also found holes in the walls filled with handguns, rifles and cash.

Bulger, the former leader of the Winter Hill Gang who was also an FBI informant, fled Boston shortly before he was indicted in early 1995 when a former agent told him he was about to be indicted.

He was one of the FBI’s most wanted fugitives until he and longtime girlfriend, Greig, were caught last June in Santa Monica. Bulger was captured 16 years after his run from the law sparked an international manhunt.

He is currently awaiting trial for his alleged role in 19 murders.

Descriptions and photos of the apartment, as well as interviews with people who knew the couple, were among hundreds of documents unsealed by prosecutors Friday, three days after Grieg was sentenced to eight years in prison for helping Bulger during his years as a fugitive.

The documents offer a glimpse into the couple’s life as fugitives.

One photo shows a shelf with a stack of books about gangsters and crime, including several about Bulger himself.

Some of the titles include “G-Men and Gangsters;” “The Untold Story of My Life Inside Whitey Bulger’s Irish Mob,” co-written by Kevin Weeks, Bulger’s former right-hand man; and “A Mob Story” by former Boston Herald reporter Michele McPhee.

But in other parts of the apartment, there are signs of a simple, more pedestrian existence.

The weekly planner contained notes about going to pharmacies — Rite Aid and CVS — and grocery stores, Trader Joe’s and Vons.

Interviews with people who knew them in California — where authorities say they spent most of the 16 years — describe a quiet, older couple who mostly kept to themselves and pretended to be from Chicago.

Joshua Bond, the general manager of the apartment building where they lived, said they were known in the neighborhood as “the old couple that always wore white.”

Bulger, he said, always wore glasses and a hat, and always had a beard.

They called themselves Carol and Charlie Gasko, he said. Bond, who lived next door, said he would sometimes see Bulger through his window sitting up all night with binoculars.

“Bond only ever saw Charlie get mad one time. This was because Bond had startled him. Charlie yelled at him and told him not to startle him again,” a summary of an FBI interview said.

Bond said Bulger gave him several gifts over the years, including a black Stetson cowboy hat, a beard trimmer and workout equipment.

“If Bond had not thought the Gaskos were such a nice old couple, he would have thought that Charlie was trying to get Bond in shape because he (Charlie) was attracted to him (Bond),” the FBI said in its description of the interview.

The photos show holes cut into the apartment walls, where authorities say Bulger hid more than 30 weapons and more than $800,000 in cash.

One photo shows handguns visible inside one hole. Another shows a picture of a crucifix taped to a doorframe above a hole in the wall, where it appears the FBI removed a mirror that was hiding it.

Another shows stacks of cash.

Other photos show the couple’s separate bedrooms. Bulger’s room is cluttered, with an unmade bed, socks strewn on the dresser and crowded shelves. On one of the shelves is a Valentines’ Day card with a picture of a puppy in front of a big red heart. Five pairs of sneakers line the top of a shelf, including four identical white pairs with blue stripes.

Bulger, nicknamed “Whitey” for his shock of bright platinum hair, grew up in a gritty South Boston housing project, and went on to become Boston’s most notorious gangster.

Along with Stephen “The Rifleman” Flemmi, he led the violent Winter Hill Gang, a largely Irish mob that ran loan-sharking, gambling and drug rackets in the Boston area. U.S. Attorney Donald K. Stern said in 2000 that the two were “responsible for a reign of intimidation and murder that spanned 25 years.””

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Feds: Trafficking ring busted smuggling kids over U.S.-Canadian border

June 8, 2012

SeattlePI.com on June 7, 2012 released the following:

“16 indicted; SeaTac motel owner faces prison is scheme
By LEVI PULKKINEN, SEATTLEPI.COM STAFF

Federal investigators have cracked a human trafficking ring thought to have smuggled dozens of illegal immigrants – including children traveling alone – over the Canadian border.

Having indicted 16 suspects in recent months, federal prosecutors in Seattle contend the loosely knit group brought more than 70 people into the United States from India, Pakistan and South Korea. Once inside the country, they were driven or flown to at least six states, including Illinois, Texas, New York and Massachusetts.

The operation – broken up by an informant and ultimately infiltrated by an undercover federal agent – was apparently lucrative for its leaders. A SeaTac hotel owner who moved and housed the smuggling ring’s customers was paid $1,000 a head just for a ride south from the U.S. side of the border.

Since the string of indictments, 11 of the 12 defendants have pleaded guilty to related charges. The other four are not yet in federal custody, according to court records.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Feds bring more charges in mortgage fraud case

March 30, 2012

Boston Business Journal on March 30, 2012 released the following:

“by Eric Convey

Federal prosecutors Thursday charged a Roslindale paralegal with unlawful monetary transactions and bank fraud for her alleged role in a straw-buyer scheme involving residential properties in Boston.

Prosecutors allege Rebecca L. Kosnevick’s and others caused hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses for a who’s who of big name lenders during the height of 2006 and 2007 real estate boom by engineering fraudulently obtained mortgages that later went into default.

Alleged victims of the scheme include: BNC Mortgage; Citibank (NYSE: C); CitiMortgage; Countywide Bank (since purchased by Bank of America (NYSE:BAC) ); Countrywide Home Loans; First Franklin Financial Corp.; First Franklin Financial Corp.; First Horizon Home Loans; Homecomings Financial LLC; IndyMac Bank; JP Morgan Chase Bank (NYSE: JPM); Long Beach Mortgage Corp.; Washington Mutual Bank; and Wells Fargo Bank (NYSE: WFC).

The government alleges Kosnevick helped arrange mortgages involving buyers who merely lent their names to deals so financing could be obtained.

“Because the stray buyers lacked either the means or the intention of paying their mortgages, mortgage loans went into default and subsequently into foreclosure,” the charging document states.

U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz’s office brought the charnges via a criminal information — a document that serves as an indictment but often is filed when a defendant is cooperating with authorities. Kosnevick’s lawyer did not immediately return a telephone call Thursday seeking comment.

The information describes Kosnevick’s alleged dealings with two men who are defendants in criminal cases involving similar allegations and some of the same properties — Lord R. Allah, also known as Richard H. Matthews, who owned L.A. Properties and Management Corp.; and Sirewl R. Cox, who owned City Real Estate and Business Brokerage of Canton, Mass.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Feds: Chicago Bears Receiver Sam Hurd Allegedly Sought to Buy Large Amount of Drugs

December 16, 2011
Sam Hurd
Bears WR Sam Hurd (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Tribune photo)

Chicago Tribune on December 15, 2011 released the following:

“By Jeremy Gorner and Vaughn McClure, Tribune reporters

Chicago Bears receiver Sam Hurd was arrested Wednesday night outside a Rosemont restaurant after he accepted a kilogram of cocaine from a confidential informant and an undercover federal agent posing as a drug supplier, according to federal charges filed Thursday in Dallas.

Hurd was charged with one count of conspiring to possess half a kilogram of cocaine with the intent to distribute it. Hurd appeared in federal court in Chicago in late afternoon and will remain in custody overnight while his attorney arranges bond.

Hurd, dressed in street clothes — fashionable jeans and a gray T-shirt — stood ramrod straight in front of the judge and replied, “Yes, sir,” to various questions about whether he understood his rights.

At the Wednesday night meeting, authorities allege that Hurd negotiated to buy five to 10 kilograms of cocaine and 1,000 pounds of marijuana a week for distribution in the Chicago area. He agreed to pay $25,000 for each kilogram of cocaine and $450 a pound for the marijuana, according to the charges.

Hurd said at the meeting that he plays for the Bears, gets out of practice at about 5:30 p.m., and would pay them on the next day, authorities said. Bears players are paid on Thursdays.

Hurd told the undercover agent and informant that he and someone else distributed about four kilograms of cocaine each week in the Chicago area but that their supplier wasn’t able to meet their needs, according to the criminal complaint.

The Bears issued the following statement: “We are aware of Sam’s arrest and are continuing to gather details surrounding it. We are disappointed whenever these circumstances arise. We will deal with them appropriately once we have all the information.”

Bears coach Lovie Smith said after practice Thursday that Hurd remains a member of the team.

“I am in shock over it,” Smith said. “Never saw it coming. My dealings with Sam here as most of you would probably say the same has all been good. He’s a guy that showed up every day to go to work.”

Hurd, who played at Northern Illinois, signed a three-year contract with the Bears this offseason after playing the previous five seasons with the Dallas Cowboys. The veteran receiver has been primarily a special teams contributor for the Bears.

Bears receiver Roy Williams, who played with Hurd for three seasons with the Cowboys, said he was “shocked” by the news.

“It’s a situation I don’t want anyone to be in, especially a close friend, a teammate that I have been playing with now for four or five years now, especially a guy from Texas with a wife and daughter,” Williams said Thursday at Halas Hall. “So, it’s tough for me just because I am not into drugs or anything like that. I know it has to be tough for him because he has his family. It’s a choice he made and there are consequences with choices that you make.”

Asked for his thoughts about Hurd, Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher said, “It’s sad for him. I’m not sure what’s going on, but you never want to hear about one of your teammates, something like this happening to them.

“He’s a good teammate. That’s what I know of him. He comes to work every day and works hard. Outside of here, I don’t know him very well. But he comes to work every day and practices hard and plays hard. That’s all I know of him. He’s a friendly guy.”

Hurd was inactive for the season opener against the Atlanta Falcons because of a sprained ankle, and has eight receptions for 109 yards on the season.

The complaint alleged that Hurd first came to the attention of federal authorities in July when the confidential informant tipped off agents that a man — later learned to be a Hurd associate — was attempting to coordinate the purchase of about four kilograms of cocaine in the Dallas area. The associate wanted to complete the deal that day so the buyer could transport the cocaine to a northern destination that same day, authorities charged.

At the direction of authorities, the informant met with the Hurd associate. After the meeting, Dallas County police conducted a traffic stop of the Hurd associate and recovered $88,000 in cash and a marijuana plant.

Hurd, who owned the vehicle pulled over by police, later reached out to federal agents and claimed that he had placed the $88,000 into the vehicle and then turned over the vehicle to the associate — who worked at a car repair shop — for maintenance and detailing work, according to the charges.

Hurd produced a bank statement that he said showed he had withdrawn the $88,000 from his account, but authorities said the statement did not reflect that size of a withdrawal.

Hurd’s three-year contract with the Bears had a maximum value of $5.15 million ($4.15 million base total), and Hurd received a $1.35 million signing bonus. His base pay this season was $685,000. The Bears could pursue trying to recover some of the signing bonus.

The investigation is being handled by the U.S. Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Dallas.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.