DOJ Recommends 15 Months for Exec in Bribery Case

September 11, 2012

The Wall Street Journal on September 10, 2012 released the following:

“By C.M. Matthews

The Justice Department said a former executive of an industrial valve manufacturer who admitted to authorizing bribes in China should be sentenced to 15 months in prison.

Federal prosecutors recommended the sentence for Paul Cosgrove, former director of international sales for Control Components Inc., in court papers filed in federal district court in Santa Ana, Calif. last week. But, the prosecutors also said they wouldn’t oppose 15 months of home confinement because of Cosgrove’s health problems.

Cosgrove pleaded guilty in May to violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which prohibits improper payments to foreign officials to win business. He was charged along with five other former Control Components executives in April 2009 in connection with an alleged bribery scheme. Two other Control Components executives were also charged in a related matter in 2009.

According to court documents, Cosgrove approved improper payments in connection with a sprawling, global bribery scheme to win contracts for Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif.-based Control Components. So far, five other former CCI executives have pleaded guilty to charges stemming from the alleged scheme. Control Components pleaded guilty in July 2009 to violating the Travel Act, which prohibits commercial bribery, and the FCPA. The company paid an $18.2 million criminal penalty and agreed to implement rigorous internal controls.

Prosecutors said last week that they could not dispute a probation office report that said Cosgrove has “serious health issues.” Cosgrove had quadruple bypass surgery in 2010, according to court documents, and suffers from chronic health problems including heart disease and diabetes. The report recommended three years of probation and six months of home confinement for Cosgrove.

But prosecutors said that was an inadequate sentence because, “the sentencing end of deterrence in FCPA cases is important as the statute is intended to combat a culture of corruption that could otherwise undercut the business development and good governance of nations around the world.” While Cosgrove’s conduct warranted jail time, they said they would not object to home confinement, so long as it was for at least 15 months.

“To the extent the Court concludes that these factors outweigh the aggravating factors which would otherwise warrant a sentence of imprisonment within the guidelines range, any period of home confinement should be as long as the otherwise-applicable term of incarceration,” they wrote. “To state it differently, the government sees nothing in the Probation Officer’s analysis which would warrant only six rather than 15 months of home detention.”

The prosecutors also said Cosgrove should pay up to $20,000 in fines.

Cosgrove’s lawyers have filed their own sentencing memorandum under seal. They didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Cosgrove’s sentencing is scheduled for Sept. 13”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Barry Bonds avoids jail, gets 2 years’ probation, home confinement

December 16, 2011

Los Angeles Times on December 16, 2011 released the following:

By: Maura Dolan in San Francisco

“Barry Bonds, baseball’s home run king, was sentenced Friday to two years’ probation with home confinement, plus a $4,000 fine, for giving evasive testimony to a federal grand jury eight years ago during an investigation of doping in sports.

Bonds, 47, was charged with several counts of perjury and obstruction of justice for lying during the grand jury’s probe of the Burlingame, Calif.-based Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, or BALCO, which sold banned substances to athletes.

A trial jury last April deadlocked on the perjury charges, returning only one conviction for felony obstruction. Jurors said Bonds obstructed justice by being intentionally evasive in his testimony.

Federal sentencing guidelines recommend 15 to 21 months in prison for obstruction, but probation officials told Judge Susan Illston that Bonds’ offense warranted much less: two years’ probation, a $4,000 fine, 250 hours of community service and “location monitoring” or home confinement.

Probation officials cited Bonds’ history of charitable and civic works — works that Bonds’ attorneys said he kept private even though they would have enhanced his reputation.

Prosecutors countered that the former San Francisco Giants star deserved 15 months in prison for his “pervasive efforts to testify falsely, to mislead the grand jury, to dodge questions, and to simply refuse to answer questions in the grand jury.””

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Bernard Joseph Tully, a Former Massachusetts State Senator, Pleads Guilty to Wire Fraud

September 1, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on August 31, 2011 released the following:

“WASHINGTON— Bernard Joseph Tully, a former Massachusetts state senator, has pleaded guilty for devising a scheme to defraud a Boston-area businessman out of approximately $18,000 by falsely representing that Tully and his co-conspirator were using the funds to bribe public officials. Unbeknownst to Tully, the businessman reported Tully’s overtures to the FBI.

The guilty plea was announced by Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz for the District of Massachusetts and Richard DesLauriers, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Boston Field Office.

Tully, 84, of Dracut, Mass., pleaded guilty yesterday before U.S. District Judge Patti B. Saris to one count of wire fraud. According to court documents, Tully formerly served as the city manager for Lowell, Mass., from approximately 1979 to 1987. Prior to serving as city manager, Tully was a state senator representing Lowell and other areas.

According to information presented at the plea hearing and in court documents, the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) determined in early 2009 that it needed to discontinue its lease for the Lowell RMV, due to lack of funds. According to court documents, Tully became aware of the possible closure of the Lowell RMV and contacted the Boston-area businessman who owned the space where the Lowell RMV was housed. Tully told the businessman that if he paid Tully, Tully would ensure a state senator would find money in order to keep the RMV in the space owned by the businessman. Later, according to court documents, Tully again contacted the businessman and told him that he need to pay Tully so that Tully could pay the public official, otherwise the RMV would have to move out of the space.

On July 3, 2009, the RMV announced it was closing the Lowell office as well as other RMV offices on July 23, 2009. Tully and a co-conspirator subsequently visited the businessman and told him that he would need to pay $20,000 to keep the RMV in Lowell. The businessman agreed that he wanted the RMV to stay, and Tully said he would start making telephone calls while his co-conspirator said he would talk to the public official.

On July 15, 2009, the businessman gave the co-conspirator a $5,000 check, which the co-conspirator cashed and gave a portion of the funds to Tully. On July 17, 2009, the businessman received a 90-day extension on the lease from the RMV to Oct. 31, 2009.

Thereafter, according to court documents, the businessman had a series of meetings and telephone conversations with Tully and his co-conspirator about securing another lease extension from the RMV. During these conversations, Tully and his co-conspirator falsely represented to the businessman that they needed additional money to make payments to various public officials in exchange for their official acts to secure the RMV’s continued presence in the businessman’s building. Between November 2009 and March 2010, the businessman, while cooperating with the FBI, paid Tully and the co-conspirator approximately $18,000 as bribe payments designed to secure the official assistance of various public officials.

In fact, Tully and his co-conspirator never paid any money to any public officials. According to court documents, Tully admitted in a May 2010 interview with FBI agents that he received approximately $12,000 in cash and checks from the businessman, and that he split the money with his co-conspirator. Tully also admitted that he had heard about the RMV’s plan to move the Lowell office out of the businessman’s office building from people who worked in the office, and that the businessman had contacted him for assistance. Tully admitted that he spoke with friends of friends of the Lowell legislative delegation about obtaining a lease extension and preventing the move of the Lowell RMV.

Tully admitted that he told the businessman that he was “throwing money around” at elected officials, but in actuality he did not. He admitted that he did this to give the businessman the impression that he, Tully, was influencing the legislative delegation.

Sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 1, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. According to the plea agreement, the government has agreed not to seek punishment beyond home confinement, 36 months of supervised release, a fine to be calculated under the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and restitution of $18,000.

The case was investigated by the FBI, with assistance from the Massachusetts Inspector General’s Office and the Lowell Police Department. It is being prosecuted by Senior Litigation Counsel William M. Welch II and Kevin Driscoll of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section, with assistance from the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Public Corruption Unit.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Ohio Man Indicted for Marijuana, Obstruction of Justice and Money Laundering Charges

June 22, 2010

A federal grand jury has returned a 13-count indictment charging Kevin L. Burton, 49, of Lucasville with conspiracy, manufacturing marijuana, obstruction of justice, and money laundering.

Burton was arrested on June 15 based on the allegations in the indictment. U.S. Magistrate Judge Elizabeth Preston Deavers ordered Burton held without bond after a detention hearing in federal court in Columbus on June 17. Burton is scheduled for trial on August 23, 2010 before Senior U.S. District Judge James L. Graham.

The indictment alleges that Burton and Anna L. Montgomery, 46, of Lucasville conspired since 1995 to manufacture 1,000 or more marijuana plants. Burton and Montgomery allegedly obtained properties in his name or in the names of others and set up rooms in residences and outbuildings to use as locations to grow the marijuana. If convicted of this crime, Burton and Montgomery face a minimum sentence of 10 years in federal prison and the possibility of life imprisonment.

Montgomery was placed on home confinement pending trial.

The indictment also charges Burton and Montgomery with one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice and one count of obstruction of justice for knowingly attempting to intimidate, threaten, influence, delay and corruptly persuade witnesses before a federal grand jury investigating the case. Each crime is punishable by up to 20 years imprisonment.

Burton is also charged with one count of maintaining a place to manufacture marijuana and nine counts of money laundering. Each count is punishable by up to 20 years imprisonment. The indictment also seeks forfeiture of three pieces of real estate and more than $413,000 in cash.

The indictment alleges that Burton laundered $293,221.16 in proceeds from the sale of marijuana through the sale of the Rubber Duck Car Wash in Jackson, Ohio.

An indictment is only an allegation. The accused are innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, Interpol Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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