Federal Grand Jury in Buffalo Indicted a Barker Man Alleging Federal Drug Trafficking Charges

September 4, 2013

The Buffalo News on September 3, 2013 released the following:

Barker man indicted on federal drug-trafficking charges

A Barker man was indicted by a federal grand jury in Buffalo on drug-trafficking charges, U.S. Attorney William J. Hochul Jr. said.

Allen M. Young, 37, is charged with with possession with intent to distribute and distribution of methylone, conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute marijuana, Young was also indicted on charges of being a felon in possession of firearms and ammunition.

Hochul said between Dec. 1 and Feb. 14, Young conspired with others to obtain and sell methylone. On Dec. 13, while members of the Orleans County Major Felony Crime Task Force were attempting to execute a search warrant on Young, he fled in his car at a high rate of speed before crashing in Ridgeway, Young fled on foot after the crash, and nine rounds of ammunition were found in his car.

Two days later a backpack, later identified as Young’s and containing 1.8 pounds of methylone, was found abandoned in the woods near the scene of the crash, Hochul said.

The prosecutor said Young was arrested in Erie, Pa., on Feb. 14.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Federal Criminal Trial Resumes in Laredo Federal Court For Three Men Accused of a Cocaine Trafficking Conspiracy

July 23, 2013

Laredo Morning Times on July 23, 2013 released the following:

Three stand trial in alleged cocaine trafficking conspiracy

By César G. Rodriguez
Laredo Morning Times

Three men are standing trial this week in federal court before U.S. District Judge Marina Garcia Marmolejo, accused of taking part in a cocaine trafficking conspiracy.

An indictment filed June 27, 2012, charges Enrique Mendez, Carlos Flores Sr., and Carlos Flores Jr., with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a quantity of at least 5 kilograms of cocaine. Mendez faces additional charges of money laundering conspiracy and obstruction by threats of force while Flores Sr. faces an added charge of possession with intent to distribute 5 kilograms or more of cocaine.

Robert Flores, Homeland Security Investigations special agent, took the stand as the first witness. He talked about several surveillance instances which implicated a man identified as Elbert Figueroa and the Floreses. Federal authorities identified Figueroa as the person in charge of the connections in Mexico and the transportation cells in Laredo. Figueroa would pick up cocaine and stash it to later be moved to Atlanta. He was also in charge of receiving drug money to later be taken into Mexico. Money seizures included sums in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Agents arrested Figueroa in 2010 on conspiracy and cocaine charges. He’s yet to be sentenced.

Part of the conspiracy was to recruit individuals to perform various functions critical to the success of the organization. An indictment states that people assisted in the storage, loading, transportation, unloading, conducting surveillance and delivery of drug shipments. During the conspiracy, commercial tractor-trailers had to be used to transport cocaine from Texas to Georgia. Drug proceeds flowed down to Laredo to pay for transportation costs and other expenses. The rest of money was headed to Mexico, according to the indictment.

In opening statements, defense attorney Silverio A. Martinez Jr., who represents Mendez, said a man violated his client’s and took advantage of the yard at KCM Transportation, 645 Rancho Peñitas Road, owned by Mendez. Martinez said truckers are not supposed to fill the trailer with illicit items.

About the “kidnapping” or obstruction by threats of force allegation against Mendez, Martinez said that was false. Martinez told jurors they’ll hear testimony that the alleged victim was at a ranch cooking out and drinking beer with an illegal immigrant. The victim had his vehicle’s keys in his pocket and was never kidnapped.

Martinez told jurors that Figueroa was protecting the real “boss” in hopes that’d reduce his sentence.

The trial resumed at 8:30 a.m. today.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


In the Eastern District of Arkansas Sixteen Defendants Have Been Charged in an Alleged Cocaine Conspiracy

May 15, 2013

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on May 14, 2013 released the following:

“Sixteen Defendants, Including Mexican Drug Cartel Members, Charged in Cocaine Conspiracy

Christopher R. Thyer, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Arkansas and Randall C. Coleman, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Little Rock Field Office, announce that a 25-count indictment handed down by a federal grand jury on May 2, 2013, was unsealed today charging sixteen defendants in Arkansas, Texas, and Mexico with multiple drug offenses. The indictment alleges the lead defendant, Idalia Ramos Rangel, a/k/a La Tia or Big Momma, is a high-ranking member of the Gulf Cartel who directs a drug trafficking organization based in Matamoros, Mexico. That organization is responsible for the distribution of multiple hundreds of kilograms of cocaine in the United States.

The indictment is the result of a large-scale investigation into cocaine and narcotics trafficking from Mexico to Arkansas. Agents determined that Rangel’s drug trafficking organization is responsible for delivery of more than one hundred kilograms of cocaine in Arkansas. The charges in the indictment include conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, distribution of cocaine, and use of a telephone to facilitate a drug trafficking crime. All 16 defendants are charged with conspiracy to distribute cocaine. If convicted of conspiracy to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, each defendant will face a sentence of not less than 10 years to life imprisonment.

“The arrests made in this case have dismantled a primary supply of cocaine into the State of Arkansas,” stated Thyer. “From the Gulf Cartel to prison to the streets of Central Arkansas, this was not a typical case to investigate. I want to thank the FBI for their leadership in this investigation. I also want to acknowledge the significant investigative work the Federal Bureau of Prisons and the Little Rock Police Department provided. Those who do business with drug cartels should be on notice that law enforcement is investigating and will commit the resources necessary to punish them for their illegal trafficking.”

“Today, a strong group of dedicated federal, state, and local law enforcement officials—from Arkansas to Texas—came together to disrupt a criminal drug enterprise directly linked to the Gulf Cartel,” stated FBI Special Agent in Charge Randall Coleman. “It was simply a case of outstanding teamwork. In Arkansas, we will continue to work together to disrupt and dismantle those groups who choose to conduct their criminal enterprise activities here.”

According to the indictment, Rangel’s family members are alleged to be involved in the drug distribution conspiracy. Her son, Mohammed Kazam Martinez, a/k/a Mo, a federal inmate in the Bureau of Prisons, recruited inmates in the Federal Correctional Complex at Forrest City, Arkansas, to distribute Rangel’s Gulf Cartel cocaine upon their release from prison. Those inmates included Emmanuel Ilo, a/k/a Chi Chi or Chi, and Mervin Johnson, a/k/a Slim, who the indictment alleges began distributing kilogram and multi-ounce quantities of the cocaine in Central Arkansas upon their release from federal prison. Mohammed Martinez communicated with members of this drug trafficking organization using the prison telephone and e-mail systems to coordinate the distribution of cocaine to, and the collection of drug proceeds from, former federal inmates and others. Another of Rangel’s sons, Homar Martinez, and one of her daughters, Nishme Martinez, are also charged as part of the conspiracy.

The indictment alleges that Ilo distributed Rangel’s Gulf Cartel cocaine to Dwatney Noid; Dwight McLittle, a/k/a D.A.; Lamont Williams, a/k/a Peter Rabbit; Gerard Trice, a/k/a Fly; Tarvars Honorable, a/k/a Pudgy; and others for redistribution to customers in the Eastern District of Arkansas. The FBI made multiple controlled purchases of cocaine in Central Arkansas totaling more than one kilogram during the investigation of this case.

The investigation was conducted by the FBI, with substantial assistance from the Federal Bureau of Prisons and the Little Rock Police Department. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Michael Gordon and Chris Givens.

An indictment contains only allegations. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

U.S. Attorney’s Office News Release

Defendants/Charges
Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine:

  • Idalia Ramos Rangel, 57, Matamoros, Mexico
  • *Mohammed Kazam Martinez, 31, Beaumount, Texas
  • *Emanuel Ilo, 34, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Mervin Johnson, 37, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • *Homar Martinez, 31, Brownsville, Texas
  • Manuel Garza, 31, Brownsville, Texas
  • *Jaime Benevides, 27, Austin, Texas
  • *Nishme Martinez, 26, Austin, Texas
  • *Denice Duran Martinez, 34, Brownsville, Texas
  • *Yadira Anahy Martinez, 36, Brownsville, Texas
  • Dwatney Noid, 30, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • *Dwight McLittle, 27, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • *Shanieka Tatum, 35, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • *Lamont Williams, 34, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Gerard Trice, 29, Little Rock, Arkansas
  • *Tarvars Honorable, 33, Little Rock, Arkansas

* Denotes individual is in custody.

In addition to the conspiracy charges, the following defendants are also charged with the following crimes:

  • Emanuel Ilo: distribution of cocaine (six counts) and use of a telephone to facilitate a drug trafficking crime (two counts)
  • Mervin Johnson: distribution of cocaine (one count)
  • Dwatney Noid: distribution of cocaine (two counts) and use of a telephone to facilitate a drug trafficking crime (two counts)
  • Dwight McLittle: distribution of cocaine (six counts)
  • Shanieka Tatum: use of a telephone to facilitate a drug trafficking crime (three counts)
  • Lamont Williams: use of a telephone to facilitate a drug trafficking crime (two counts)
  • Gerard Trice: use of a telephone to facilitate a drug trafficking crime (two counts)
  • Tarvars Honorable: distribution of cocaine base (one count) and use of a telephone to facilitate a drug trafficking crime (one count).

Statutory Sentences

Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine is punishable by not less than 10 years, not more than life, incarceration in the Bureau of Prisons with a possible fine of up to $10,000,000, and not less than five years’ supervised release.

Possession with intent to distribute less than 500 grams of cocaine or less than 28 grams of cocaine base is punishable by not more than 20 years’ incarceration in the Bureau of Prisons with a possible fine of up to $1,000,000 and not less than three years’ supervised release.

Use of a communication facility to facilitate a drug trafficking crime are not more than four years’ incarceration in the Bureau of Prisons with a possible fine of up to $250,000 and not more than one year supervised release.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Federal prosecutors charge two men alleging methamphetamine trafficking in Amarillo

October 26, 2012

Lubbock Avalanche-Journal on October 25, 2012 released the following:

“Troopers found 17 pounds of the drug in separate Carson County stops

By AZIZA MUSA
AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS

AMARILLO — Federal prosecutors charged two men with methamphetamine trafficking after Department of Public Safety troopers found 17 pounds of the drug in separate Carson County stops.

Hugo Beltran-Ruiz, 42, and Elider Garcia, 30, were charged with possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine, according to court records.

The first stop happened shortly before 7 p.m. Oct. 16, when the driver of a Toyota Corolla was following a tractor-trailer too closely, authorities said. The driver, Mayra Ramirez, told troopers she rented the car from a Hertz in California for Beltran-Ruiz, a passenger, so they could shop in Oklahoma, according to court documents.

After writing a ticket, the trooper got consent to search the car and found nine vacuum-sealed bags of methamphetamine — totaling 10 pounds — hidden in the car’s rear door panels, the complaint said.

Beltran-Ruiz told authorities he was transporting the drugs from Ontario, Calif., to Oklahoma, authorities said.

The next day about 9:30 a.m., a trooper stopped a Toyota Camry for following another vehicle too closely, authorities said. Authorities wrote a ticket, received consent to search the car and found 7 pounds of meth in a compartment between the glove box and firewall, court records show.

The driver, Marixa Alfaro, told authorities she wasn’t aware of any drugs in the car, prosecutors said.

Garcia, the passenger, initially told officers his name was Paul Aranda but authorities learned his true identity as a Mexican citizen who was previously deported, according to court records. Garcia told troopers he was moving the meth from Los Angeles, prosecutors said.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Operation Prairie Thunder Results in Drug Trafficking Charges Against 17 on Standing Rock Sioux Reservation

June 6, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on June 5, 2012 released the following:

“Multiple Law Enforcement Agencies and Prosecutors’ Offices Involved in 14-Month Operation and Arrests Made Today

BISMARCK— U.S. Attorney for the District of North Dakota Timothy Q. Purdon announced that a total of 17 defendants have been arrested and charged with drug trafficking offenses in federal court in North Dakota and South Dakota and in Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Court as a result of Operation Prairie Thunder. The federal and tribal drug charges are the result of “Operation Prairie Thunder,” a 14-month-long investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Justice Services on the Standing Rock Reservation. Multiple arrests of Operation Prairie Thunder defendants were made today on the Standing Rock Reservation by a cooperating team of federal, local, and tribal law enforcement officers.

In Bismarck, U.S. Attorney Purdon said, “The charges filed as a result of Operation Prairie Thunder will make the Standing Rock community stronger and safer. The U.S. Attorney’s Office is committed to a strategy in Indian Country that is built on close cooperation between federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies and prosecutors. This cooperation has resulted in charges being filed, not just in federal court, but also in the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s own tribal court where appropriate. Cooperation like this means better law enforcement, better prosecutions and safer communities.”

In Sioux Falls, U.S. Attorney for the District of South Dakota Brendan Johnson said, “These indictments illustrate the progress that is being made in Standing Rock and throughout Indian Country in South Dakota and North Dakota. The success of this investigation was the result of close cooperation between dedicated professionals in numerous law enforcement agencies.” U.S. Attorney Johnson added, “These are serious offenses, and we will continue our efforts to work with our law enforcement partners to investigate and eradicate large-scale drug conspiracies in the Dakotas.”

In Fort Yates, Standing Rock Sioux Chief Prosecutor Grant Walker said, “Close cooperation between the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Prosecutor’s Office and the U.S. Attorney’s Office has allowed the tribe to participate directly in Operation Prairie Thunder by charging, where appropriate, additional defendants tied to this investigation in tribal court. By being a partner in this operation, the Standing Rock Tribe is able, through the exercise of its own sovereignty, to make its own important contribution to the safety of its community. ”

Acting Special Agent in Charge Richard D. Schwein of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Minneapolis Field Office, which includes North Dakota and South Dakota said, “The arrests resulting from this joint investigation serve as a shining example of cooperative law enforcement efforts in the region. The FBI, along with our partners, remains unwavering in its commitment to the safety and well-being of people on the Standing Rock Reservation.”

“Jurisdictional issues exist throughout Indian Country and working together with other federal, state, and local agencies in a common goal is essential for Indian Country law enforcement,” said Bureau of Indian Affairs Special Agent in Charge Mario Redlegs. “This operation affirms to the people of Standing Rock that we are watching vigilantly and ensuring that they do have a safe place to live.”

U.S. Attorney Purdon praised the coordinated efforts of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Justice Services, United States Marshals Service, Homeland Security Investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration, Sioux County Sheriff’s Department, and the United States Parole and Pre-Trial Services in achieving the near simultaneous arrests today on the Standing Rock Reservation of many of those charged in the Operation Prairie Thunder cases.

Those charged as a result of Operation Prairie Thunder include:

Charged in United States District Court, District of North Dakota:

  • Casey Dogskin, 5023 Mule Deer Street, Fort Yates, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of marijuana;
  • Donald White Lightning, 5014 3rd Avenue, Cannonball, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of marijuana (two counts);
  • Francis Lester, 5664 Douglas Skye Complex, Fort Yates, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of morphine; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of Ritalin; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of Oxycodone;
  • Bryan See Walker, 5659 Douglas Skye Complex, Fort Yates, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of marijuana (two counts);
  • Paul Miner, 29 5Hawk Avenue, Fort Yates, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of hydrocodone; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of marijuana; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of oxycodone;
  • Sage Claymore, 479 Whitetail Street, Fort Yates, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of marijuana (two counts);
  • James Grant, 546 Warrior Street, Fort Yates, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of morphine;
  • Muriel Long Feather, address unknown; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of oxycodone;
  • Winfield Kills Crow, sddress unknown; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of morphine;
  • Allen Siegfried, 5005 4th Ave., Cannonball, North Dakota; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of morphine;

Charged in United States District Court, District of South Dakota:

  • Chaske Little Bear, address unknown; distribution of a controlled substance (two counts);
  • Francine Jensen, address unknown; distribution of a controlled substance;

Charged in Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Tribal Court:

  • Lance Summers Fort Yates, North Dakota; criminal sale of drugs
  • Chad Yellow Lodge Fort Yates, North Dakota; criminal sale of drugs
  • Odette Elk, Fort Yates, North Dakota; criminal sale of drugs
  • Rodney Claymore, address unknown; criminal possession of drugs;
  • Claude Ramsey, address unknown; criminal possession of drug paraphernalia

An indictment or a complaint is not evidence that the defendants committed the crimes charged. The defendants are presumed innocent until the government meets its burden in court of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

The Operation Prairie Thunder cases are being prosecuted in North Dakota federal court by Assistant U.S. Attorney Gary Delorme, in South Dakota federal court by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jay Miller, and in Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Court by Chief Tribal Prosecutor Grant Walker.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Twenty-Three Arrested by the FBI on Federal Charges as a Result of San Antonio Eastside Gang Violence Initiative

May 14, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on May 11, 2012 released the following:

Six-Month-Long Operation Triple Beam Results in Approximately 700 Additional Arrests Based on State Charges

Twenty-three San Antonio gang members face federal charges in connection with a federal, state, and local law enforcement operation targeting Eastside gang violence.

That announcement was made jointly today by United States Attorney Robert Pitman, Bexar County District Attorney Susan Reed, San Antonio Police Chief William McManus, Bexar County Sheriff Amadeo Ortiz, United States Marshal Robert Almonte, ATF Assistant Special Agent in Charge Crisanto Perez, DEA Assistant Special Agent in Charge Manuel Fernandez, and FBI Special Agent in Charge Armando Fernandez.

The operation, initiated in response to community outcry, focused on narcotics trafficking and violent acts committed by members of rival gangs including the East Terrace Gangster Crips, Crockett Blocc Crips, Wheatly Courts Bloods, Blood Stixx, Denver Heights Bloods, as well as other San Antonio area gangs operating on the city’s Eastside. During this operation, authorities have seized more than 70 firearms, approximately 38 kilograms of narcotics, and an estimated $85,500 in U.S. currency.

The 23 defendants, all listed below, are charged by either a federal grand jury indictment or criminal complaint filed since March 7, 2012. Federal charges include felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a firearm during a drug trafficking crime, possession with intent to distribute “crack” cocaine, and maintaining a residence for the distribution of a controlled substance. State charges filed in connection with this investigation include: narcotics-related offenses, unlawful carrying of a firearm, and gang injunction violations.

This investigation was conducted by the San Antonio Police Department Gang Unit; Bexar County District Attorney’s Office; Bexar County Sheriff’s Office; Bexar County Adult Probation Office; United States Marshals Service; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; together with the Drug Enforcement Administration; Federal Bureau of Investigation; Texas Department of Public Safety-Narcotics Division; and the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

It is important to note that an indictment is merely a charge and should not be considered as evidence of guilt. The defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Operation Triple Beam arrests release:

Defendant—Age

Bal, Raja—27
Brock, Demetrius—35
Butler, Alvin—33
Farris, Robert—25
Fields, Tyronn—30
Fisher, Devonshae—18
Foster, Brian—27
Girela, Joshua—24
Hemphill, Emmanuel—26
Hemphill, Katherine—58
Johnson, Rodney—23
Johnson, Samuel—27
Losoya, Juan—28
Mackey, Antoine—29
Martinez, Michael—19
McHenry, Dominick—21
Miller, Glen—32
Minor, Milton—34
Molden, Travis—22
Phillips, Marcus—24
Robinson, Chris—34
Robinson-McClellan, Devon—22
Robinson-Tynes, Marcus—24″

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Several Individuals Charged in Texas in Alleged Murder-for-Hire Plot and Drug Conspiracy

March 26, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on March 26, 2012 released the following:

“LAREDO, TX—Several men have been arrested and charged in a conspiracy related to drug trafficking and/or an attempted murder-for-hire plot, U.S. Attorney Kenneth Magidson announced today. Kevin Corley, 29, and Samuel Walker, 28, both of Colorado Springs, Colorado; and Shavar Davis, 29, of Denver, were taken into custody Saturday afternoon in Laredo, while Marcus Mickle, 20, and Calvin Epps, 26, both of Hopkins, South Carolina, were arrested in South Carolina. A sixth man, Mario Corley, 40, of Saginaw, Texas, was also taken into custody in relation to this case in Charleston, South Carolina.

The criminal complaint charging Corley, Walker, and Davis was filed just a short time ago in Laredo federal court, at which time they made their initial appearances before U.S. Magistrate Judge Diana Song Quiroga. Mickle and Epps, charged in a now-unsealed indictment, are expected to make their initial appearances in Columbia, South Carolina this afternoon.

The investigation began in January 2011, when Mickle began negotiations with whom he thought were members of the Los Zetas Cartel, but were actually undercover Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents, to purchase marijuana in return for stolen weapons. The criminal complaint indicates that as they began discussions about the distribution of marijuana in the Columbia, South Carolina area, Mickle and Epps allegedly told undercover agents about a friend in the military who could provide military weapons to them. The agents were later introduced to Corley, who allegedly identified himself as an active duty officer in the U.S. Army responsible for training soldiers. He offered to provide tactical training for cartel members and to purchase weapons for the cartel under his name.

The complaint states that over the next several months, Corley continued to communicate with undercover agents regarding the services he could provide the cartel as a result of the training, experience, and access to information/equipment afforded him as an active duty soldier. According to the criminal complaint, Corley allegedly mailed an Army tactics battle book to the agents, thoroughly explained military tactics, and told undercover agents he could train 40 cartel members in two weeks.

On January 7, 2012, Corley traveled to Laredo and met with undercover agents, at which time the agents inquired about his ability to perform “wet work,” allegedly understood to mean murder-for-hire; specifically, whether he could provide a team to raid a ranch where 20 kilograms of stolen cocaine were being kept by rival cartel members. Corley confirmed he would conduct the contract killing with a small team, at a minimum comprised of himself and another person whom he described as an active duty soldier with whom he had already consulted. According to the complaint, Corley ultimately agreed to $50,000 and five kilograms of cocaine to perform the contract killing and retrieve the 20 kilograms of cocaine, and he offered to refund the money if the victim survived.

Corley further offered to provide security for Mickle and Epps’ purchase of 500 pounds of marijuana for transport from Texas to South Carolina. He traveled with them to Laredo, where they loaded the marijuana into a tractor trailer and attempted to escort it back to South Carolina. However, the tractor trailer carrying the load was stopped and seized in La Salle County, Texas, on January 14, 2012. According to the complaint, Corley continued to contact undercover agents to discuss the possibility of future transactions with the agents. Corley allegedly arranged for 300 pounds of marijuana to be delivered to Mario Corley in Charleston and allegedly assisted in brokering 500 pounds of marijuana and five kilograms of cocaine for Mickle and Epps and discussed the distribution of these narcotics in South Carolina, Texas, and Colorado.

On March 5, 2012, Corley delivered two AR-15 assault rifles with scopes, an airsoft assault rifle, five allegedly stolen ballistic vests, and other miscellaneous equipment to an undercover agent in Colorado Springs in exchange for $10,000. At the meeting, Corley and the undercover agent allegedly again discussed the contract killing and the retrieval of the cocaine, which was to occur on March 24, 2012. Corley allegedly stated he had purchased a new Ka-Bar knife to carve a “Z” into the victim’s chest and was planning on buying a hatchet to dismember the body.

On March 24, 2012, Corley, Walker, and Davis traveled to Laredo and met with undercover agents, at which time they discussed the location of the intended victim, the logistics of performing the contract kill, and their respective roles. The three were arrested, during which time a fourth suspect was shot and killed. A subsequent search of the vehicle in which Corley and the other co-conspirators arrived revealed two semi-automatic rifles with scopes, one bolt-action rifle with a scope and bipod, one hatchet, one Ka-Bar knife, one bag of .223 caliber ammunition, and one box of .300 caliber ammunition.

The criminal complaint charges conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and carries a possible punishment of a minimum of 10 years and up to life in prison and/or a $10 million fine. Use of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking or violent crime could result in up to 10 years in prison, which is served consecutively to any other prison term imposed. Those charged in the indictment for conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute more than 100 kilograms of marijuana, including Corley, Mickle, and Epps, also face five to 40 years in prison if convicted.

Corley, Walker, and Davis are set for a detention hearing on March 29, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. before Judge Song Quiroga in the Southern District of Texas. They were all remanded to federal custody pending further criminal proceedings.

The investigation leading to the charges was conducted by the DEA and the FBI with the assistance of U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Roberto Ramirez and Jody Young.

Criminal complaints and indictments are formal accusations of criminal conduct, not evidence. Defendants are presumed innocent unless and until convicted through due process of law.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.