Witness in Clemens trial says was told Clemens used drug

May 29, 2012

Fox News on May 29, 2012 released the following:

Reuters

“Ex-trainer Brian McNamee, who says he injected performance-enhancing drugs into former pitching ace Roger Clemens, told a client that Clemens had used human growth hormone to recover more quickly from injuries and strains, the client testified on Tuesday.

Prosecution witness Anthony Corso’s testimony bolsters that of McNamee, a former strength and conditioning coach, whose allegations that he injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone have been the core of the government’s case.

Federal prosecutors claim the retired pitching star lied to a congressional panel when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs.

“Mr McNamee had mentioned that Mr. Clemens was one of the athletes that he was getting positive results from him being able to push himself to limits … using the medication to recover,” Corso, 49, testified.

Clemens’ lawyers sought to cast doubt on Corso’s testimony when the witness revealed he could not recall whether McNamee had mentioned Clemens during a conversation about saving syringes from players using the drugs.

Corso testified that McNamee had told him in or around 2005 that the trainer had saved syringes from players to avoid getting “thrown under the bus” should the drug usage be discovered but said McNamee had not named Clemens as one of those players.

According to prosecutors, Corso had told a grand jury in 2010 that McNamee claimed the syringes had been “used on Roger.”

“The two answers are different. So would it be a fair testimony … that you made a mistake?” Clemens’ lawyer Rusty Hardin asked.

“Yes,” Corso said.

Clemens’ attorneys have worked to paint McNamee as a liar who obtained immunity in exchange for his testimony.

McNamee has said that he saved medical waste from a 2001 injection of anabolic steroids into Clemens and turned the evidence in to authorities in 2008.

Clemens, 49, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner as best pitcher, is being tried for a second time on federal charges of lying in 2008 to the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, which was investigating drug use in Major League Baseball. His first trial ended last year in a mistrial.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Prosecutors Poised to Rest in Roger Clemens’ Federal Criminal Trial

May 29, 2012

MLB.com on May 29, 2012 released the following:

By John Schlegel / MLB.com

“Prosecutors poised to rest case vs. Clemens

WASHINGTON — As the seventh week of the Roger Clemens federal perjury trial begins, the prosecution is poised to rest its case against the former star pitcher.

With likely two witnesses remaining before the government’s case gives way to the defense’s case, which lead attorney Rusty Hardin has said will take seven or eight court days to present, the prosecution has called 21 witnesses over 19 days of complicated, detailed and sometimes tedious testimony to attempt to prove to jurors beyond a reasonable doubt that Clemens lied to Congress in 2008.

The defense will continue to endeavor to raise that doubt with its case, which will include repeat appearances from federal agents Jeff Novitzky and John Longmire, who each spent several hours on the stand as witnesses for the prosecution.

Before Hardin and fellow defense attorney Michael Attanasio, who proved to be a potent force in cross-examination of witnesses from Andy Pettitte to scientific experts, take their turn in presenting Clemens’ case, the prosecution will wrap up its presentation with what it hopes is an effective finale Tuesday.

Clemens is charged with three counts of making false statements, two counts of perjury and one count of obstruction of Congress based on his testimony during a Feb. 13, 2008, hearing before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and a Feb. 5, 2008, deposition conducted by committee staff members. Clemens said at the hearing, “Let me be clear: I have never used steroids or HGH.”

Brian McNamee, who served as a strength and conditioning trainer to Clemens in one capacity or another for nearly a decade, said in his own deposition and at that same hearing and again in a week-long stay on the witness stand in the trial that he had injected Clemens with performance-enhancing drugs on numerous occasions, keeping items he says proves it in a beer can and a mailing box for nearly seven years.

Forensic scientist Alan Keel revealed Friday that Clemens’ DNA was found on a needle and two cotton balls that were part of the physical evidence McNamee kept in his house for several years before turning it over to the government. Keel also withstood rigorous cross-examination from Attanasio and numerous skeptical questions from jurors.

When court reconvenes Tuesday, the government intends to call Wall Street investment manager Anthony Corso and FBI forensic scientist Eric Pokorak. Prosecutors indicated at one point they might call one other as yet unnamed witness as well.

Corso is expected to testify about how McNamee told him in 2002 that Clemens had used HGH to help with recovery and told him in 2005 that he had saved needles from Clemens, combining with the testimony from former Major Leaguer David Segui to further rebut defense attacks that McNamee made up his story to appease federal investigators in 2007.

Pokorak likely will tie up the loose ends on the forensics introduced so far. Testimony has yet to provide the link between the items Keel testified had Clemens’ DNA to the steroids that other scientific experts testified were found on the items.

The government filed a pair of motions on Memorial Day. One moves to rebut the defense’s attacks on Keel and inform the jury that the defense also could have tested the evidence.

The other motion attempts to head off some of the character witnesses the defense intends to call, asking the court to “preclude or limit additional evidence of the defendant’s athletic work ethic and any opinion testimony by former coaches, trainers or teammates regarding the defendant not showing any signs of steroid or HGH use.”

The government argued that such testimony should open the door to testimony from other baseball players who “also adhered to strong athletic work ethics but nonetheless used steroids or HGH to perform better than their competitors.”

The pace of the trial was a significant issue earlier in the trial, which was projected to last 4-6 weeks — so much so that Judge Reggie Walton imposed time limits on the attorneys of 90 minutes for direct and cross. But Walton allowed both sides some leeway on that with Keel, given the importance of the evidence he discussed. Juror questions of Keel took about an hour as well.

Two jurors were excused for falling asleep on the job, and now a third juror may not be able to return. Juror No. 16, a Metro transit police officer, found out as Friday’s proceedings were coming to a close that her mother had passed away. Walton indicated it’s unlikely she’ll return to duty, which would leave the jury panel with 12 jurors and just one alternate remaining.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


FBI chemist unable to identify a user of performance enhancing drugs

May 24, 2012

Chron.com on May 24, 2012 released the following:

“FBI chemist Pamela Reynolds tested medical waste that Brian McNamee stored in a beer can for seven years — and found a number of controlled substances.

But the prosecution witness told the jury in Roger Clemens’ perjury trial today that she was unable to identify a user of the performance enhancing drugs.

“You can’t tell us who used them?” asked defense attorney Mike Attanasio.

“That’s correct,” she replied.

“You can’t tell us if anybody used them?” he continued.

“That’s correct,” Reynolds added

The chemist, saying she was unable to say whether anybody used the substances, said she was only able to place performance enhancing drugs within the beer can.

Also in evidence was a bottle of 309 white pills. The pills were all unmarked. A total of 308 of the pills were of uniform size and the only substance found during analysis was lactose, a sugar component, Reynolds testified.

One of the pills was of a smaller size and when tested was found to contain a controlled substance.

However, as with the materials found in the beer can, Reynolds said was unable to determine how the one pill came to be in the container and who, if anyone was using it.

Following Reynolds’ testimony, prosecutors continued to build their case toward eventual testimony from lab scientists that traces of Clemens’ DNA were found on medical waste inside McNamee’s beer can cache of needles and cotton balls.

Jeremy Price, a former scientist with the Anti-Doping Research firm based in Los Angeles, told jurors that the firm’s tests of medical waste found steroid residue.

But Price, like Reynolds, was unable to link the steroid residue to Clemens or any other individual.

Price did tell jurors, however, the lab testing did not find traces of vitamin B-12 or lidocaine on the tested medical waste.

Those are the substances that Clemens claims he received in injections from McNamee.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Clemens trial hears FBI witness describe handling of needles

May 8, 2012

MySanAntonio.com on May 7, 2012 released the following:

“By Stewart M. Powell and Regina Garcia Cano

WASHINGTON — Prosecutors on Monday tediously chronicled the shipment, handling and testing of medical waste allegedly containing DNA from former pitcher Roger Clemens in a bid to show he used performance-enhancing drugs before allegedly lying about it to Congress.

Though even U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton urged government lawyers to speed it up, federal prosecutor Steve Durham methodically questioned FBI special agent John Longmire to describe the treatment of needles, cotton balls and vials allegedly used by Brian McNamee to inject the legendary pitcher with the controversial substances.

Prosecutors are banking that subsequent testimony by lab technicians will establish that medical waste retained by McNamee for more than seven years contains both Clemens’ DNA and outlawed performance-enhancing drugs such as anabolic steroids or human growth hormone.

Clemens, 49, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, has not been charged with using performance-enhancing medications that are banned without a doctor’s prescription. But prosecutors are trying to use the medical waste and McNamee’s expected testimony as early as today to show that Clemens used the medications — a first step in the prosecution’s effort to prove that Clemens had lied to Congress in 2008 when he denied using anabolic steroids or human growth hormone.

Longmire’s detailed accounting for the medical waste Monday focused on at least three needles, one syringe, two cotton swabs, two cotton balls, gauze pad and at least two sheets of Kleenex. Some of the waste had been stored by McNamee in an empty Miller Lite beer can for at least seven years; other items of the waste had been loosely stored before McNamee turned all of the medical waste over to federal authorities in January 2008.

Prosecutors contend the medical waste stems from McNamee injecting Clemens with performance-enhancing drugs on multiple occasions between 1998 and 2001 before players were subjected to mandatory random drug testing.

Clemens’ defense team sought to undermine the FBI agent’s testimony with repeated questions about just how carefully agents handled individual items of medical waste.

“During the time you had custody of the evidence you didn’t do anything untoward to that evidence?” defense lawyer Michael Attanasio asked Longmire. The FBI agent said he had not.

Attanasio sought to use Longmire’s testimony to call into question McNamee’s handling of the forensic evidence before he turned it over to federal authorities.

“Did you ever seal medical waste in an open container like a beer can?” Attanasio asked.

Longmire replied: “I have not done that. That is not what they trained us to do.”

Longmire acknowledged that some items were only tested by the FBI lab while others also were tested by two private independent medical labs in California.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Clemens trial resumes with more from federal agent

May 7, 2012

The Wall Street Journal on May 7, 2012 released the following:

“Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Federal agent Jeff Novitzky returns for a third day of testimony Monday in the Roger Clemens perjury trial, while behind the scenes Clemens’ lawyers sought to strike the testimony of former teammate Andy Pettitte.

Last week, Pettitte testified that Clemens told him he had tried human growth hormone, only to say under cross-examination that he might have misunderstood Clemens. As expected, Clemens’ lawyers filed a motion asking that the jury not be allowed to consider the conversation between the two pitchers.

Pettitte said that it was “fair” to say that there was a 50 percent chance he misunderstood Clemens, his friend and one-time mentor.

“The court should not allow the jury to consider an alleged ‘admission’ that has all the weight of a coin flip,” Clemens’ lawyers wrote in a filing Monday morning, before the resumption of the trial.

Clemens is accused of lying to Congress in 2008 when he denied using HGH and steroids.

Meanwhile, the government will conclude its re-direct questioning of Novitzky, an agent with the Food and Drug Administration. He has already been questioned by the government and cross-examined by Clemens’ lawyer.

Last week, Novitzky described the physical evidence he had collected from Clemens’ former strength coach, Brian McNamee. Prosecutors will try to prove the evidence shows the former baseball pitcher used steroids and human growth hormone.

Clemens’ lawyers have said they will contend that the evidence has been tainted and contaminated.

McNamee is expected to testify later this week, perhaps as early as Tuesday.

Prosecutors got off to a rough start Monday, when U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton told them they could not play a clip of a 2008 Clemens’ “60 Minutes” interview for the jury. In the clip, Clemens says he was advised by counsel not to talk to former Sen. George Mitchell, who was investigating performance-enhancing drugs in baseball and would identify Clemens as a user in his report to Major League Baseball.

After the interview aired, Clemens testified to Congress that he didn’t know that Mitchell wanted to talk to him. Prosecutors wanted to show the “60 Minutes” clip in an attempt to show Clemens was obstructing Congress, arguing the two statements were contradictory. But Walton said the clip could not be played without interfering with the attorney-client privilege. He also said it was possible Clemens was told generally by lawyers not to talk to Mitchell, without actually informing the pitcher that Mitchell wanted to talk to him.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.