FBI: “Former Kinloch Mayor Indicted for Lying on Employment Records”

July 11, 2013

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on July 10, 2013 released the following:

“ST. LOUIS, MO— Former Kinloch Mayor Keith Conway was indicted on federal charges of falsifying employment records while completing his original sentence at a St. Louis halfway house, the Dismas House.

According to the indictment, on May 1, 2013, the United States Bureau of Prisons transferred Conway from its prison facility at Marion, Illinois, to the Dismas House residential re-entry center in St. Louis. The Bureau of Prisons contracts with Dismas House for the housing and supervision of inmates and retains jurisdiction and responsibility over those inmates until their ultimate release from Bureau of Prisons’ custody upon completion of their sentences. As a resident of Dismas House, Conway was required to seek and obtain full-time employment and to submit paycheck stubs to verify that employment to the Dismas House Program Director. While a resident at Dismas House awaiting final release from the Bureau of Prisons, Conway falsely represented that he had obtained full-time employment and was permitted to leave the Dismas House premises during his purported work hours.

Conway was originally sentenced to 21 months in prison in November 2011 on charges of using Kinloch city funds to pay personal expenses, fund personal travel, and purchase a Florida vacation condominium timeshare; and attempting to influence Kinloch City Officials to provide false information to federal law enforcement about the criminal charges pending against him.

Conway, 49, was indicted by a federal grand jury on four felony counts of filing false documents.

If convicted, each count carries a maximum penalty of five years and/or fines up to $250,000. In determining the actual sentences, a judge is required to consider the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines, which provide recommended sentencing ranges.

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Public Corruption Unit, including officers of the St. Louis County Police Department. Assistant United States Attorney Hal Goldsmith is handling the case for the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

As is always the case, charges set forth in an indictment are merely accusations and do not constitute proof of guilt. Every defendant is presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


“Taiwanese Father and Son Arrested for Allegedly Violating U.S. Laws to Prevent Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction”

May 7, 2013

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on May 6, 2013 released the following:

“CHICAGO— A resident of Taiwan whom the U.S. government has linked to the supply of weapons machinery to North Korea, and his son, who resides in suburban Chicago, are facing federal charges here for allegedly conspiring to violate U.S. laws designed to thwart the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, federal law enforcement officials announced today.

Hsien Tai Tsai, also known as “Alex Tsai,” who is believed to reside in Taiwan, was arrested last Wednesday in Tallinn, Estonia, while his son, Yueh-Hsun Tsai, also known as “Gary Tsai,” who is from Taiwan and is a legal permanent resident in the United States, was arrested the same day at his home in Glenview, Illinios.

Gary Tsai, 36, was ordered held in custody pending a detention hearing at 1:30 p.m. today before Magistrate Judge Susan Cox in U.S. District Court in Chicago. Alex Tsai, 67, remains in custody in Estonia pending proceedings to extradite him to the United States.

Both men were charged in federal court in Chicago with three identical offenses in separate complaints that were filed previously and unsealed following their arrests. Each was charged with one count of conspiring to defraud the United States in its enforcement of laws and regulations prohibiting the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, one count of conspiracy to violate the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) by conspiring to evade the restrictions imposed on Alex Tsai and two of his companies by the U.S. Treasury Department, and one count of money laundering.

The arrests and charges were announced by Gary S. Shapiro, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; Cory B. Nelson, Special Agent in Charge of the Chicago Office of the FBI; Gary Hartwig, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Chicago; and Ronald B. Orzel, Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, Office of Export Enforcement, Chicago Field Office. The Justice Department’s National Security Division and Office of International Affairs assisted with the investigation. U.S. officials thanked the Estonian Internal Security Service and the Estonian Prosecutor’s Office for their cooperation.

According to both complaint affidavits, agents have been investigating Alex and Gary Tsai, as well as Individual A (a Taiwanese associate of Alex Tsai) and a network of companies engaged in the export of U.S. origin goods and machinery that could be used to produce weapons of mass destruction. The investigation has revealed that Alex and Gary Tsai and Individual A are associated with at least three companies based in Taiwan—Global Interface Company Inc., Trans Merits Co. Ltd., and Trans Multi Mechanics Co. Ltd.—that have purchased and then exported, and attempted to purchase and then export, from the United States machinery used to fabricate metals and other materials with a high degree of precision.

On January 16, 2009, under Executive Order 13382, which sanctions proliferators of weapons of mass destruction and their supporters, the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designated Alex Tsai, Global Interface, and Trans Merits as proliferators of weapons of mass destruction, isolating them from the U.S. financial and commercial systems and prohibiting any person or company in the United States from knowingly engaging in any transaction or dealing with Alex Tsai and the two Taiwanese companies.

In announcing the January 2009 OFAC order, the Treasury Department said that Alex Tsai was designated for providing, or attempting to provide, financial, technological, or other support for, or goods or services in support of the Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID), which was designated as a proliferator by President George W. Bush in June 2005. The Treasury Department asserted that Alex Tsai “has been supplying goods with weapons production capabilities to KOMID and its subordinates since the late 1990s, and he has been involved in shipping items to North Korea that could be used to support North Korea’s advanced weapons program.” The Treasury Department further said that Global Interface was designated “for being owned or controlled by Tsai,” who is a shareholder of the company and acts as its president. Tsai is also the general manager of Trans Merits Co. Ltd., which was designated for being a subsidiary owned or controlled by Global Interface Company Inc.

After the OFAC designations, Alex and Gary Tsai and Individual A allegedly continued to conduct business together but attempted to hide Alex Tsai’s and Trans Merit’s involvement in those transactions by conducting business under different company names, including Trans Multi Mechanics. For example, by August 2009—approximately eight months after the OFAC designations—Alex and Gary Tsai, Individual A, and others allegedly began using Trans Multi Mechanics to purchase and export machinery on behalf of Trans Merits and Alex Tsai. Specifically, the charges allege that in September 2009, they purchased a Bryant center hole grinder from a U.S. company based in suburban Chicago and exported it to Taiwan using the company Trans Multi Mechanics. A Bryant center hole grinder is a machine tool used to grind a center hole, with precisely smooth sides, through the length of a material.

The charges further allege that by at least September 2009, Gary Tsai had formed a machine tool company named Factory Direct Machine Tools in Glenview, Illinois, which was in the business of importing and exporting machine tools, parts, and other items to and from the United States. However, the charges allege that Alex Tsai and Trans Merits were active partners in Factory Direct Machine Tools, in some instances procuring the goods for import to the United States for Factory Direct Machine Tool customers.

Violating IEEPA carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine; money laundering carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $500,000 fine; and conspiracy to defraud the United States carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. If convicted, the court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal statutes and the advisory U.S. Sentencing Guidelines. The government is being represented by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Patrick Pope and Brian Hayes.

The public is reminded that a complaint is not evidence of guilt. The defendants are presumed innocent and are entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Leo Joshua Kennedy Indicted by a San Jose Federal Grand Jury for Allegedly Committing Wire Fraud in a $17 Million Fraud Scheme

November 1, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on October 31, 2012 released the following:

“Danville Man Charged in $17 Million Fraud Scheme

SAN JOSE, CA— A federal grand jury in San Jose indicted Leo Joshua Kennedy, of Danville, California, today with 10 counts of wire fraud, United States Attorney Melinda Haag announced.

According to the indictment, Kennedy, 60, is alleged to have stolen $17 million from various beneficiary trust accounts at Backhouse Fiduciary Services. While working as an accountant for Backhouse Fiduciary Services, a San Jose based administrator of beneficiary trust accounts, the defendant allegedly transferred funds from various trust accounts without the account-holders’ permission. Kennedy allegedly used those funds to pay for his personal investments and living expenses.

Kennedy is scheduled to make his initial appearance in federal court in San Jose on November 20, 2012, before Magistrate Judge Grewal.

The maximum statutory penalty for each count of wire fraud in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1343 is 20 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 or twice the gross gain or gross loss from the offense, plus restitution. However, any sentence following conviction would be imposed by the court after consideration of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and the federal statute governing the imposition of a sentence, 18 U.S.C. § 3553.

Jeff Schenk is the Assistant U.S. Attorney who is prosecuting the case with the assistance of Kamille Singh. The prosecution is the result of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Please note, an indictment contains only allegations against an individual and, as with all defendants, Kennedy must be presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Today’s announcement is part of efforts underway by President Obama’s Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force (FFETF) which was created in November 2009 to wage an aggressive, coordinated, and proactive effort to investigate and prosecute financial crimes. With more than 20 federal agencies, 94 U.S. attorneys’ offices and state and local partners, it is the broadest coalition of law enforcement, investigatory, and regulatory agencies ever assembled to combat fraud. Since its formation, the task force has made great strides in facilitating increased investigation and prosecution of financial crimes; enhancing coordination and cooperation among federal, state, and local authorities; addressing discrimination in the lending and financial markets and conducting outreach to the public, victims, financial institutions, and other organizations. Over the past three fiscal years, the Justice Department has filed more than 10,000 financial fraud cases against nearly 15,000 defendants including more than 2,700 mortgage fraud defendants. For more information on the task force, visit http://www.stopfraud.gov.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Gupta to Urge Probation From Judge Who Once Defended Insiders

October 22, 2012

San Francisco Chronicle on October 22, 2012 released the following:

“Patricia Hurtado and David Glovin, ©2012 Bloomberg News

Oct. 22 (Bloomberg) — As a lawyer, Jed Rakoff once persuaded a judge to give probation to a client convicted at an insider-trading trial alongside former Wall Street Journal reporter R. Foster Winans. Now a federal judge himself, Rakoff must weigh Rajat Gupta’s similar request to stay out of prison.

Gupta, a former Goldman Sachs Group Inc. director, will come before Rakoff in Manhattan federal court on Oct. 24 to be sentenced for leaking stock tips to Galleon Group LLC co-founder Raj Rajaratnam. Prosecutors say Gupta, convicted by a jury in June, deserves as long as 10 years in prison. Gupta seeks probation.

Gary Naftalis, a lawyer for Gupta, argued his client’s crime was an “aberrational” event in a “lifetime of good works” that merited a punishment for a man who has suffered an extraordinary fall from grace. He asked Rakoff to impose a term of community service, suggesting Gupta work with troubled youth in New York or with the poor in Rwanda.

“Good works help, but on their own they are rarely a ‘Get out of jail free card,’” said Gordon Mehler, a former federal prosecutor who’s now in private practice in New York. “So, it seems as if probation, even in Rwanda, is unlikely.”

Gupta, 63, is the most prominent of 70 people convicted since a nationwide insider-trading crackdown by U.S. prosecutors began four years ago. Gupta also served as managing partner of McKinsey & Co. from 1994 to 2003 and on the board of Procter & Gamble Co. from 2007 to March 2011, when he also resigned from the boards of Goldman Sachs, AMR Corp. and two other companies.

Buffett’s Berkshire

After a four-week trial in June, jurors found Gupta guilty of tipping Rajaratnam about dealings at New York-based Goldman Sachs, including a $5 billion investment by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Rajaratnam, 55, is serving 11 years in prison for trading on tips from Gupta and others.

In his 17 years as a judge, Rakoff has sentenced at least nine defendants for insider trading, including seven who pleaded guilty and two whom he jailed after they were found guilty by juries. Rakoff has a track record of imposing a sentence that is half what the government recommends.

“If there is any judge who’s sensitive to the draconian impact of the sentencing guidelines with respect to white-collar offenders, it’s Judge Rakoff,” said J. Bruce Maffeo, a former federal prosecutor now in private practice. “That being said, he’s equally sensitive to the need to fashion a sentence that takes into account both the defendant’s personal background and the need to deter others in the financial world, where this kind of activity appears to be more prevalent than previously assumed.”

Winning Leniency

Rakoff, a former federal prosecutor in New York who headed the office’s securities-fraud unit, was a white-collar criminal- defense lawyer before taking the bench.

As a defense lawyer, Rakoff won leniency for a client convicted of insider trading who was also facing prison.

Rakofff’s client, David Carpenter, went on trial in 1985 with his lover, journalist R. Foster Winans, and broker Kenneth Felis. Prosecutors said Winans leaked tips to Felis about forthcoming market-moving articles in his “Heard on the Street” column, Felis traded on the news and Carpenter allowed Winans to place trades through his account. All were convicted. Carpenter died in 1991.

Wife, Husband

At the sentencing, Rakoff compared Carpenter’s relationship with Winans to that of wife-and-husband and said Carpenter merely acquiesced to Winans’ trades, according to Winans’s lawyer, Don Buchwald. Carpenter got probation while Winans was given an 18-month prison term.

“He was following Foster,” Buchwald said in a phone interview last week. “Carpenter was a very sympathetic figure.”

This week, Gupta will be seeking sympathy of a different sort from Rakoff. Gupta’s lawyer, Naftalis, said in a court filing that Gupta deserves probation because his crime was an aberration in a life “defined by helping others.”

Naftalis cited Gupta’s work as chairman of the Global Fund, an initiative to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, as well as his work with the United Nations to improve world health. Naftalis declined to comment on a comparison of the Gupta and Carpenter cases. The defense submitted more than 400 letters to the judge describing Gupta’s accomplishments.

In their pre-sentencing court filings, prosecutors gave a different portrait of Gupta and asked Rakoff to consider the personal relationship between Gupta and Rajaratnam.

‘Very Close Friend’

In asking for a term of 97 months to 121 months, which they say are called for by U.S. sentencing guidelines, prosecutors say Gupta violated confidences and breached his duty as a senior corporate official by leaking news to his “very close friend” and business partner.

“Gupta’s interests often were aligned with those of Rajaratnam and Galleon such that Gupta stood to benefit if Galleon was successful,” prosecutors wrote in a filing, citing Gupta’s investment in Galleon and their partnership in another investment fund.

Richard Holwell, the former federal judge who presided over Rajaratnam’s trial and sentenced the fund manager, said judges consider “general deterrence,” or whether the sentence they impose will deter others from committing similar crimes.

“The nature and circumstances of the crime weigh in the government’s favor, because insider trading is a serious white- collar crime that undermines the integrity of the markets” said Holwell, who is now in private practice.

Deterrence

“The government will lean on general deterrence because insider trading has to be eradicated and one way to do that is by taking highly visible cases and making examples of them,” Holwell said. “That will weigh heavily on Rakoff.”

Other criminal defense lawyers said Gupta’s fall from grace may work in his favor. Kevin O’Brien, a former federal prosecutor in New York, said the judge must weigh Gupta’s achievements against his crimes.

“There is human drama there,” O’Brien said. “You can make the argument that for a guy like this who was on top of the world to have fallen so low and to have been so humiliated and exposed by a lengthy public trial, that is punishment enough.”

“What is smart about the Rwanda option is that it makes vivid Gupta’s commitment to public service and brings out with some clarity his history of good deeds,” he said. “It’s a creative approach.”

‘Mirage’ Guidelines

Federal sentencing guidelines are advisory. Rakoff’s history has been one of imposing sentences well below the recommended federal guidelines, which he has called a “mirage of something that can be obtained with arithmetic certainty.”

Last year, he sentenced James Fleishman, a former executive at expert-networking firm Primary Global Research LLC, to 2 1/2 years in prison for passing tips to fund managers while the guidelines called for more than seven years. He also ordered Primary Global consultant Winifred Jiau to serve 48 months for selling information. Her guidelines suggested a term of 78 months to 97 months in prison.

Still, Rakoff has rarely been silent about the contempt he has for insider traders, often expressing his sentiments in open court. In Fleishman’s case, he said insider prosecutions over “the last 30 or 40 years” have not “done enough to deter this serious and sophisticated crime.”

With Jiau, whose scheme ran for two years, he said the leaks undermined “the integrity of the financial markets” and demanded a “meaningful sentence.”

Maffeo said he believes Rakoff will impose some term of incarceration upon Gupta.

Love Families

Rakoff has demanded prison in cases in which, unlike Gupta, the defendants have admitted trafficking in illicit information. He sentenced ex-SAC Capital Advisors LP manager Donald Longueuil to 30 months instead of the 46 months to 57 months urged by the guidelines. He ordered a former Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. manager to spend 18 months behind bars.

“Why is it that defendants always remember how much they love their families after they’ve committed the crimes that place that relationship in jeopardy?” Rakoff said at the sentencing of former Galleon trader Adam Smith, who won probation largely because he cooperated with prosecutors and testified against Rajaratnam.

Rakoff imposed an 18-month prison term on Manosha Karunatilaka, a former Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. manager who pleaded guilty to passing nonpublic information about his company’s orders to fund managers as part of an insider-trading scheme. Karunatilaka cooperated with the U.S. and accepted responsibility for his crimes.

Crying Infant

As Karunatilaka’s infant child cried in the courtroom, Rakoff rejected a bid by defense lawyer Brad Bailey to impose a term of six months’ in prison and six months of home confinement.

Gupta, after two days of deliberations by a jury, was found guilty of three counts of securities fraud and one count of conspiracy. The tips came in September and October 2008 and concerned Buffett’s $5 billion investment in Goldman Sachs and the bank’s losses in the fourth quarter of 2008.

Jurors acquitted Gupta of charges that he leaked information that Cincinnati-based P&G’s organic sales growth would fall below estimates and that he tipped Rajaratnam about Goldman Sachs’s earnings in the first quarter of 2007.

In his filing, Naftalis argued that Gupta deserves leniency because his crimes were limited to a two-month period in 2008.

Peter Henning, a professor at Wayne State University Law School in Detroit, said Rakoff will focus on the nature of the crime and Gupta’s background. Henning predicted that the former Goldman Sachs director will get a prison term of two years to three years.

“That’s not a deleterious prison term, but it is prison and it doesn’t mean he will get a free pass,” Henning said in a phone interview. “It has to be a term to get everyone’s attention, and by everyone, I mean Wall Street.”

The case is U.S. v. Gupta, 11-cr-00907, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Jamie Askew, St. Louis Community Credit Union Employee, Indicted for Alleged Embezzlement

August 10, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on August 9, 2012 released the following:

“ST. LOUIS, MO— Jamie Askew was indicted for allegedly embezzling approximately $104,755 from the St. Louis Community Credit Union between July 2009 and May 2012.

Jamie Askew, Troy, Illinois, was indicted by a federal grand jury on one felony count of embezzlement from a credit union.

If convicted, this charge carries a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison. In determining the actual sentences, a judge is required to consider the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines, which provide recommended sentencing ranges.

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. First Assistant United States Attorney Michael W. Reap is handling the case for the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

As is always the case, charges set forth in an indictment are merely accusations and do not constitute proof of guilt. Every defendant is presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

————————————————————–

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Former Loan Officer Sergio Martinez Indicted by a Federal Grand Jury with Bank Fraud, False Statement to Influence a Financial Institution, Wire Fraud, and Conspiracy to Commit Wire Fraud in an Alleged Mortgage Fraud Scheme

May 8, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on May 7, 2012 released the following:

“Former Loan Officer and Resident of Tucson Indicted for Mortgage Fraud Scheme

TUCSON— Last week, a five-count indictment was unsealed. The indictment, which was returned by a federal grand jury on March 29, 2012, charges former loan officer Sergio Martinez, 35, of Tucson, with bank fraud, false statement to influence a financial institution, wire fraud, and conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Martinez was arrested on the indictment last month in Buffalo, New York.

The indictment alleges that Martinez participated in a scheme to defraud a financial institution in order to obtain financing. Although Martinez was not the listed loan applicant, he allegedly caused to be submitted a loan application that contained material false statements including: (1) a false representation that the loan applicant was self-employed; (2) a falsely inflated income; and (3) a false representation that no part of the down payment was borrowed. The indictment further alleges that another document submitted to the lender falsely represented that the borrower would provide $359,982.38 in cash to close the deal when, in fact, the borrower and Martinez received a separate loan that was used to provide most of that cash. These documents were allegedly provided to obtain $1.4 million in loans to purchase a $1.75 million home. After the financing was used to purchase the property, the home went into foreclosure due to lack of payments. The foreclosure resulted in a significant loss to the lender.

An indictment is simply the method by which a person is charged with criminal activity and raises no inference of guilt. An individual is presumed innocent until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

A conviction for bank fraud, false statement to influence a financial institution, wire fraud, and conspiracy to commit wire fraud each carries a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison, a $1,000,000 fine, or both. In determining the actual sentence, Judge Collins will consult the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines, which provide appropriate sentencing ranges. Judge Collins, however, is not bound by those guidelines in determining a sentence.

The investigation preceding the indictment was conducted by the Internal Revenue Servic-Criminal Investigation Division and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The prosecution is being handled by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Arizona, Tucson.”

US v Sergio Martinez – Federal Criminal Indictment

18 U.S.C. § 1014

18 U.S.C. § 1343

18 U.S.C. § 1344

18 U.S.C. § 1349

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Videos:

Federal Crimes – Be Careful

Federal Crimes – Be Proactive

Federal Crimes – Federal Indictment

Federal Crimes – Detention Hearing

Federal Mail Fraud Crimes

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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


News Guide: Key details in Clemens perjury trial

April 16, 2012

Associated Press on April 16, 2012 released the following:

“WASHINGTON (AP) — Roger Clemens’ second perjury trial began Monday, following a mistrial in the first case when prosecutors showed inadmissible evidence to the jury.

The famed former pitcher is accused of ying to Congress in 2008 when he said he never used performance-enhancing drugs.

The new trial, which begins with jury selection, is expected to last four to six weeks.

Some key data and figures in the case:

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CHARGES:

Three counts of making false statements, two counts of perjury and one count of obstruction of Congress.

POSSIBLE PENALTIES:

If convicted on all counts, Clemens could face up to 30 years in prison and a $1.5 million fine. But with no prior criminal record, under U.S. sentencing guidelines, he would probably face no more than 15 to 21 months in prison.

WITNESSES

Former baseball stars Barry Bonds and Jose Canseco were on the list of 104 potential witnesses or people who might be mentioned at trial that was read to the jury pool. In addition to Bonds and Canseco, prosecutors said they might call baseball commissioner Bud Selig and New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman. Clemens’ attorneys said they might call his former teammates Paul O’Neill, Jorge Posada and Mike Stanton and baseball writer Peter Gammons.

JURY SELECTION:

U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton asked 90 potential jurors 86 yes-or-no screening questions designed to uncover personal history or attitudes, medical problems or scheduling conflicts that might reveal potential prejudice or an inability to serve. Among them: “Do you have any opinions about Major League Baseball – good, bad or whatever?” Jury pool members who had “yes” answers marked them on a sheet of paper. The lawyers and judge then began questioning them individually about those answers. In addition to people disqualified by the judge for cause, the defense will be allowed reject 10 potential jurors and the prosecutors can veto six – without explanation – until 12 are seated. Then each side will get two such unexplained strikes until four alternates are chosen, in case any jurors have to drop out during the trial.

THUMBNAILS:

– Roger Clemens: The famed pitcher, who won a record seven Cy Young Awards, said he never used steroids or human growth hormone during his baseball career. But prosecutors maintain he lied and broke the law when he made that denial under oath to a congressional committee in 2008.

– Brian McNamee: The strength trainer who worked out with Clemens for a decade, he helped mold The Rocket into one of the most feared power pitchers in the major leagues, even into his 40s. McNamee maintains he injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone – and saved the needles, which will be evidence at trial. He’ll be the prosecution’s most important witness.

– Andy Pettitte: The pitcher and former teammate of Clemens – with both the New York Yankees and Houston Astros – is the only person besides McNamee who says Clemens acknowledged using drugs. Clemens has said his former friend is “a very honest fellow” but insists he “misremembers” their conversation, said to have taken place in 1999 or 2000.

– Kirk Radomski: The former batboy with the New York Mets was the primary source behind the 2007 Mitchell Report examining the use of performance-enhancing drugs in Major League Baseball. Radomski has admitted providing drugs to dozens of players, and McNamee says he got the drugs for Clemens from Radomski.

– U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton: The judge is a former athlete himself – he went to college on a football scholarship. In declaring a mistrial last year, Walton blamed prosecutors for a mistake that a “first-year law student” wouldn’t make. No stranger to high-profile cases, he presided over the trial of former Vice President Dick Cheney’s onetime chief of staff, Scooter Libby.

– Rusty Hardin: Clemens’ lead attorney has a reputation for winning jurors over with plenty of Southern charm and colorful quips aimed to bring down opponents.

– Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven Durham: One of two prosecutors who worked on the original case last summer, which ended in a mistrial because prosecutors showed the jury inadmissible evidence, Durham is chief of the public corruption unit at the U.S. attorney’s office in Washington.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.