Three Charged with Allegedly Making Threats Against University of Pittsburgh

August 16, 2012

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on August 15, 2012 released the following:

“PITTSBURGH— A federal grand jury in the Western District of Pennsylvania today returned two indictments charging a resident of Dublin, Ireland, with a series of crimes related to e-mailed threats targeting the University of Pittsburgh, three federal courthouses, and a federal officer. A third indictment charges two Ohio men for additional online threats against the university, announced U.S. Attorney David J. Hickton.

A 35-count indictment named Adam Stuart Busby, 64, of Dublin, as the sole defendant. According to the indictment, from March 30, 2012 until April 21, 2012, Busby sent more than 40 e-mails targeting the University of Pittsburgh campus. The e-mailed bomb threats resulted in more than 100 evacuations at the University of Pittsburgh, greatly disrupting the university community. The indictment charges Busby with 17 counts of wire fraud, 16 counts of maliciously conveying false information in the form of bomb threats, and two counts of international extortion.

A separate but related four-count indictment alleges that on June 20 and 21, 2012, Busby maliciously conveyed false information through the Internet claiming bombs had been placed at U.S. courthouses located in Pittsburgh, Erie, and Johnstown, Pennsylvania. In addition, Busby is charged with threatening David J. Hickton, a federal officer, while he was engaged in the performance of his official duties.

A one-count indictment named Alexander Waterland, 24, of Loveland, Ohio; and Brett Hudson, 26, of Hillsboro, Ohio, as defendants. According to the indictment, between April 25, 2012 and May 23, 2012, Waterland and Hudson engaged in a conspiracy targeting the University of Pittsburgh with interstate threats claiming they were associates of the computer hacking group Anonymous. The threats—posted on YouTube by a user calling himself “AnonOperative13,” sent via e-mail, and publicized via Twitter—attempted to extort the chancellor of the university into placing an apology on the university’s website. The threats claimed that if the chancellor did not comply with their demands, confidential information stored on the computer servers of the University of Pittsburgh would be released.

The maximum penalty for wire fraud is 20 years in prison. The maximum penalty for maliciously conveying false information is 10 years in prison. The maximum penalty for extortionate threats is two years in prison. Because all counts charged are felonies, the maximum fine on each count is $250,000. The law provides for a maximum sentence of five years in prison, a fine of $250,000, or both for Waterland and Hudson. Under the federal sentencing guidelines, the actual sentence imposed would be based upon the seriousness of the offenses and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendants.

Assistant U.S. Attorney James T. Kitchen is prosecuting these cases on behalf of the government.

The FBI, the Western Pennsylvania Joint Terrorism Task Force, and the University of Pittsburgh Police Department conducted the investigation leading to the indictment in these cases.

An indictment is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Jamar Pharr Plead Guilty in Federal Court to Conspiracy to Engage in a Racketeering Enterprise and Devon Sheale Pled Guilty in Federal Court to Violence in Aid of Racketeering

August 19, 2011

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) on August 18, 2011 released the following:

“Two Pittsburgh Crips Members Plead Guilty to Racketeering Charges

Additional Pittsburgh Crips Gang Member Sentenced to Prison

WASHINGTON – Two members of the Crips gang pleaded guilty today in federal court in Pittsburgh to charges of conspiring to conduct a racketeering enterprise, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney David J. Hickton of the Western District of Pennsylvania.

Jamar Pharr, 27, of Pittsburgh, aka “Brownway,” pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to engage in a racketeering enterprise before Senior U.S. District Judge Gustave Diamond in the Western District of Pennsylvania. Devon Shealey, 25, of Pittsburgh, pleaded guilty before Judge Diamond to one count of violence in aid of racketeering.

In addition, yesterday Karl Anger, 22, aka “K-Loc,” was sentenced by Judge Diamond to 58 months in prison for conspiracy to participate in a racketeering enterprise, consecutive to 72 months he is currently serving on a state court conviction for an aggravated assault shooting, for a total of 130 months in prison. The shooting was also charged in the federal indictment as part of the racketeering conspiracy. Anger pleaded guilty on Jan. 19, 2011, to the federal racketeering conspiracy charge.

According to court documents, Pharr, Shealey, Anger and others participated in a pattern of racketeering activity that included robberies at gun point; attempted murders; distribution of heroin and crack cocaine; obstruction of justice and witness intimidation. The three defendants were members of different gangs in the Northside area of Pittsburgh that formed an alliance in 2003 to expand the gang’s drug trafficking territory and increase the gang’s membership to better protect their territory and profits. Members of the gang, known as the Brighton Place/Northview Heights Crips, maintained exclusive control over drug trafficking in these neighborhoods through continuous violence and intimidation of rivals and witnesses. Gang members supported each other through payment of attorneys’ fees and bonds, as well as payments to jail commissary accounts and support payments to incarcerated members’ families.

Gang members had violent confrontations with members of the rival Manchester OGs, and other street gangs operating in the Northside area of Pittsburgh. Members and associates obtained greater authority and prestige within the enterprise based on their reputation for violence and their ability to obtain and sell a steady supply of illegal drugs. According to court documents, the Brighton Place/Northview Heights Crips gang members identify themselves by wearing blue, flashing Crips gang hand signals, and using phrases such as “Cuz,” “C-Safe,” “Loc” and “G.K.”

According to court documents, Pharr was considered a respected member and leader in the enterprise. Pharr had a reputation for violence, and instructed other members and associates of the enterprise as to how to conduct the affairs of the enterprise, including how to possess and distribute firearms and controlled substances, and how to commit acts of violence and witness intimidation. Pharr also distributed controlled substances, including heroin.

Shealey and Anger were considered “gorillas” or “soldiers” for the enterprise, providing protection for the enterprise through the possession of firearms and committing acts of violence. Specifically, according to Shealey’s plea agreement, he was involved in shooting at a member of the Manchester OGs, in an effort to maintain and increase his position within the gang. According to information presented at sentencing, Anger obstructed justice when he tried to convince the victim in his assault case not to testify.

At sentencing, Pharr and Shealey each face maximum prison sentences of 20 years. Shealey is scheduled to be sentenced on Oct. 19, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., and Pharr on Dec. 15, 2011, at 10:00 a.m.

Pharr, Shealey and Anger are three of 26 defendants charged in February 2010 with being members of, and conducting racketeering activity through, the Brighton Place/Northview Heights Crips gang. This prosecution resulted from a Project Safe Neighborhoods Task Force investigation that began in 2005. To date, 23 members or associates of the Brighton Place/ Northview Heights Crips who were charged in this indictment have pleaded guilty to racketeering charges.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Charles A. Eberle and Troy Rivetti of the Western District of Pennsylvania and Trial Attorney Kevin Rosenberg of the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section. The case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police; the Allegheny County, Penn., Police Department; and the Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Pennsylvania Man Indicted for Allegedly Soliciting Jihadists to Kill Americans

July 14, 2011

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on July 14, 2011 released the following:

“WASHINGTON— Emerson Winfield Begolly, 22, of New Bethlehem, Pa., was indicted by a federal grand jury in Alexandria, Va., today for allegedly soliciting Islamic extremists to engage in acts of terrorism within the United States and posting bomb-making instruction materials online.

The indictment was announced by Neil H. MacBride, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia; Lisa Monaco, Assistant Attorney General for National Security; James W. McJunkin, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI Washington Field Office; and David J. Hickton, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania.

“Emerson Begolly is accused of repeatedly using the Internet to promote violent jihad against Americans,” said U.S. Attorney MacBride. “These allegations demonstrate how young people in the United States can become influenced by – and eventually participate in – jihadist propaganda that is a serious threat to the safety of us all.”

“Today’s case underscores the continuing threat posed by homegrown extremists seeking to use the Internet to incite violence,” said Assistant Attorney General Monaco.

“Today, the FBI is faced with a complex threat environment that combines homegrown extremism and the Internet,” said Assistant Director in Charge McJunkin. “The FBI’s top priority is stopping terrorism, and we remain vigilant against those who solicit violent acts in the United States.”

“Those who attempt to harm or kill Americans will face a determined, coordinated law enforcement effort,” said U.S. Attorney Hickton.

According to the two-count indictment, Begolly has been an active moderator of a popular, internationally known Islamic extremist web forum, the Ansar al-Mujahideen English Forum (AMEF), used by its members to promote and distribute jihadist propaganda. The indictment alleges that since July 2010, Begolly has placed a number of postings encouraging attacks within the United States, including the use of firearms, explosives and propane tanks against targets such as police stations, post offices, synagogues military facilities, train lines, bridges, cell phone towers and water plants.

Following the reported shootings in Northern Virginia at the Pentagon and the Marine Corps Museum in October 2010, Begolly allegedly posted a comment online that praised the shootings and hoped the shooter had followed his previous postings encouraging similar acts of violence that might “seem small but cause big damage.”

On Dec. 28, 2010, Begolly allegedly posted links to a 101-page document that contains information on how to set up a laboratory, conduct basic chemistry and manufacture explosives.

The indictment charges Begolly with solicitation to commit a crime of violence, which carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, and distribution of information relating to explosives, destructive devices and weapons of mass destruction, which carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison.

On Feb. 2, 2011, Begolly was indicted for allegedly assaulting federal agents and firearms-related charges in the Western District of Pennsylvania. He faces a maximum sentence of life in prison if convicted of the charges filed in that district.

Criminal indictments are only charges and not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty.

This case is being investigated by the FBI Washington Field Office. Assistant U.S. Attorney Neil Hammerstrom of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia’s National Security and International Crime Unit, Assistant U.S. Attorney James Kitchen of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and Trial Attorney Stephen Ponticiello of the Counterterrorism Section in the Justice Department’s National Security Division are prosecuting the case.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Raymond Anthony Napolitan Indicted by a Federal Grand Jury with Possessing Cocaine, 21 Firearms

June 30, 2011

U.S. Attorney’s Office Western District of Pennsylvania on June 29, 2011 released the following press release:

“PITTSBURGH, JUNE 29, 2011 ‑ A resident of Farrell, Pa., has been indicted by a federal grand jury in Pittsburgh on charges of violating the federal narcotics and firearms laws, United States Attorney David J. Hickton announced today.

The two-count indictment named Raymond Anthony Napolitan, 48, as the sole defendant.

According to the indictment presented to the court, on June 29, 2007, Napolitan possessed with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine; in addition, he possessed 21 firearms in furtherance of that crime.

The law provides for a maximum total sentence of not less than ten (10) years and up to life in prison, a fine of $1,250,000, or both. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentence imposed would be based upon the seriousness of the offenses and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant.

Assistant United States Attorney Troy Rivetti is prosecuting this case on behalf of the government.

The Southwest Mercer County Regional Police Department, the Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General Bureau of Narcotics Investigation and Drug Control, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office and the Mercer County Drug Task Force conducted the investigation leading to the indictment in this case.

An indictment or information is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Terrance Clark a Pittsburgh Crips Gang Member Pleads Guilty to Racketeering Charges

June 21, 2011

The Department of Justice (DOJ) on June 21, 2011 released the following press release:

“WASHINGTON – A Pittsburgh man has pleaded guilty in federal court to charges of conspiring to conduct a racketeering enterprise related to his membership in a Pittsburgh Crips gang, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney David J. Hickton of the Western District of Pennsylvania.

Terrance Clark, 22, aka “Doo Wop,” pleaded guilty yesterday before Senior U.S. District Judge Gustave Diamond to one count of conspiracy to engage in a racketeering enterprise.

According to the guilty plea, Clark and others participated in a pattern of racketeering activity that included multiple acts involving robberies at gun point; attempted murders; distribution of controlled substances, including cocaine, heroin and crack cocaine; and obstruction of justice and witness intimidation.

According to court documents, Clark was a member of the Northview Heights/ Fineview Crips, a criminal street gang operating out of the Northview Heights public housing facility in the Northside neighborhood, and in the nearby Fineview neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The gang had been operating in the Northside since 2002; in 2003, it formed an alliance with the Brighton Place Crips to expand the gang’s drug trafficking territory and increase the gang’s capability for violence.

The Brighton Place/Northview Heights Crips gang maintains exclusive control over drug trafficking in these neighborhoods through continuous violence and intimidation of rivals and witnesses. Members of the gang support each other through payment of attorneys’ fees and bonds, as well as payments to jail commissary accounts and support payments to incarcerated members’ families.

In addition, the Brighton Place/Northview Heights Crips gang maintains an ongoing feud with the Manchester Original Gangsters, a criminal street gang located in the Manchester area of the Northside Section of Pittsburgh. Brighton Place/Northview Heights Crips gang members identify themselves by wearing blue, using Crips gang hand signals, and using phrases such as “Cuz,” “C-Safe,” “Loc” and “G.K.” According to court documents, members and associates of the gang gain greater authority and prestige within the gang based upon their reputation for violence and their ability to obtain and sell a steady supply of illegal drugs.

According to court documents, Clark acted as a “hustler” or distributor of controlled substances, including heroin, cocaine and crack cocaine, for the gang. He also acted as a “soldier/ gorilla” or enforcer for the gang, providing protection for the enterprise through the commission of violent crimes. According to information presented in court, Clark and a co-conspirator were responsible for at least two armed robberies, one of which involved a carjacking. Clark was also involved in at least two instances relating to the obstruction of criminal investigations, including a homicide prosecution. In addition, in December 2007, Clark pointed a firearm at several Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) agents and task force officers as they drove an unmarked car through the Brighton Place neighborhood seeking to serve a subpoena on a government witness. Subsequent recorded telephone conversations from jail between Clark and his co-conspirators showed that Clark initially believed the occupants of the vehicle were members of a rival gang attempting to shoot at him and his fellow Crips members.

Clark is one of 26 defendants charged in February 2010 with being members of, and conducting racketeering activity through, the Brighton Place/Northview Heights Crips gang. This prosecution resulted from a Project Safe Neighborhoods Task Force investigation that began in 2005. To date, 16 members of the Brighton Place/ Northview Heights Crips who were charged in this indictment have pleaded guilty to racketeering charges.

Clark faces a maximum sentence of life in prison and a fine of $250,000. He is scheduled to be sentenced on Oct. 20, 2011.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Charles A. Eberle and Troy Rivetti of the Western District of Pennsylvania and Trial Attorney Kevin Rosenberg of the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section. The case was investigated by the ATF; the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police; the Allegheny County, Penn., Police Department; and the Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Forty‑one Members or Associates of the Manchester OG’s Charged with Federal Drug Crimes and Federal Firearm Violations

June 16, 2011

U.S. Attorney’s Office Western District of Pennsylvania on June 15, 2011 released the following press release:

“PITTSBURGH, JUNE 15, 2011 ‑ Forty‑one members or associates of the Manchester OG’s, a large and violent heroin trafficking organization operating primarily on Pittsburgh’s North Side, have been indicted by a federal grand jury in Pittsburgh for violating federal narcotics trafficking and firearms laws, United States Attorney David J. Hickton announced today.

According to U.S. Attorney Hickton, “Previously, we advised the violent criminals who tyrannize the neighborhoods and towns in our District that we know who you are; we are coming for you; and it is only a matter of when not if we catch you and disrupt and prosecute your criminal activity. Today’s superseding indictment underscores our commitment. These indictments and other prosecutions reflect the priority of this Office to dedicate our resources to disrupt and ultimately neutralize the criminals who have taken our neighborhoods from us with their crime and violence.”

An eight‑count superseding indictment, returned on June 7, and unsealed today, names 19 defendants: Harold Bacon, Andre Allen, Marcus Allen, Clayton Bonner, Samuel Crawford, Dawn Freeman, Kalan Jones, Denorris Mahone, III, Clarence Thompson, Richard Wagner, Gregory Washington, Eric Bosh, Danielle Krawchick, Sirblue Martin, Dorian Owens, Eugene Ralph, Kevin Richardson, Duane Scott, and Deian Wofford.

According to the superseding indictment, from January 2010 to March 3, 2011, in the Western District of Pennsylvania and elsewhere, the defendants conspired to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin. In addition, the superseding indictment charges Bacon, Mahone, III, Andre Allen, and Freeman with distributing and/or possessing heroin with intent to distribute it. The superseding indictment also charges Bacon and Freeman with possessing firearms in furtherance of drug trafficking crimes.

A separate, but related 21‑count superseding indictment, returned on June 7, and unsealed today, names 24 defendants: Jeremiah Manghan, Andre Allen, Devon Baskin, Keenan Black, Clayton Bonner, John Burton, Randale Chapman, Daniel Coker, Eric Durah, James Ellis, Robert Good, Lamont Hunter, Sondra Hunter, Robert Jennings, Chawna Manghan, Jordan McKoy, Deron Nixon, Nico Nixon, David White, Marcus Williams, Sade Frazier, Kayla Jefferson, Danielle Johnson, and Paul Wilkins.

According to the superseding indictment, from January 2010 to March 3, 2011, in the Western District of Pennsylvania and elsewhere, 21 of the 24 defendants conspired to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin. In addition, the superseding indictment charges Chawna Manghan with maintaining a drug‑involved premises, and Jeremiah Manghan, Marcus Williams, Devon Baskin, Deron Nixon, Randale Chapman, Keenan Black, Sondra Hunter, James Ellis, Sade Frazier, Chawna Manghan, and Danielle Johnson with distributing and/or possessing heroin with intent to distribute. The superseding indictment also charges Devon Baskin, Deron Nixon, Randale Chapman, Keenan Black, Danielle Johnson, and Jeremiah Manghan with possessing firearms in furtherance of drug trafficking crimes; Eric Durah, Devon Baskin, Randale Chapman, and Keenan Black with possessing firearms after felony convictions; and Jeremiah Manghan with receiving a firearm while under indictment for a felony crime.

The law provides for a maximum total sentence of at least 10 years and up to life in prison, and a fine of up to $10,000,000. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentences imposed would be based upon the seriousness of the offenses and the prior criminal histories, if any, of the defendants.

Assistant United States Attorney Craig W. Haller is prosecuting this case on behalf of the United States.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, the Pittsburgh Police Department, the United States Postal Inspection Service, the Pennsylvania State Police, the Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office, the Ross Township Police Department, the Canonsburg Police Department, and the Allegheny County Police Department investigated this case.

A superseding indictment is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

To find additional federal criminal news, please read The Federal Crimes Watch Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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